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Helium Sun, Jupiter WHY?

  1. Sep 13, 2004 #1
    Stuck again with this "not so informational" astronomy book, and we need help with a question.

    What produced the helium in the Suns atmosphere, Jupiters atmosphere, and the suns core?

    :cry:


    can anyone help us?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Sep 13, 2004 #2

    Simfish

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    The planetary gases originally had helium; it's the 2nd most abundant gas in our universe.
     
  4. Sep 13, 2004 #3

    chroot

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    The big bang produced most of the helium that exists today. 75% of the mass created in the big bang was hydrogen, and the rest was almost all helium. Stars do fuse hydrogen to helium in their cores however, so some of the helium in the Sun's core is a fusion product, while some of it is primordial.

    - Warren
     
  5. Sep 13, 2004 #4
    Thank you both, We read somewhere it was because of the bigbang, we just needed more information to go off of to make a correct answer. I appriciate both of you takin time out to help us.

    Thanks again :D
     
  6. Sep 14, 2004 #5

    Phobos

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    just to add to the good responses...

    The Big Bang created lot of subatomic particles (the building blocks of atoms). 300,000 years later when the universe cooled enough, those building blocks formed the smallest atoms (as you would expect)...hydrogen and helium.
     
  7. Sep 15, 2004 #6
    these answers are for "the sun".. are they the same for jupiter??
     
  8. Sep 15, 2004 #7

    Nereid

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    In a word, yes.

    The observational challenges are huge - we can't take direct samples of the inside of the Sun, nor Jupiter; in both cases we can only 'see' (in the optical, UV, IR, radio, etc) the 'surface' of the objects. Of course, we have samples of the solar wind (and the recently crashed Genesis satellite would have given us much more data on this!), and some info on the near Jovian environment (from Galileo), but those results need to be interpreted with caution.

    So, estimates of the bulk elemental composition of these bodies relies heavily on modeling (using well-established, earthly, physics) and observational techniques such as helioseismology (and boring things like the bulk density and moments of inertia). You can also consider it to be a kind of linear programming exercise - what values of elemental abundance are consistent with the wide range of different observational and experimental results?
     
  9. Sep 15, 2004 #8

    Phobos

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    FWIW, the Galileo mission also dropped a probe into the cloudtops of Jupiter for some direct measurements.
    http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/journey-probe.cfm
     
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