HELP! Boltzmann law in terms of classical physics?

  • Thread starter P-Jay1
  • Start date
  • #1
32
0
The Stefan-Boltzmann law is as follows: The energy radiated by a black body radiater per second per unit area is directly proportional to the fourth power of the absolute temperature.

Equation: I = σT^4

Is it possible to explain this law by means of classical physics only? If so, please explain.
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
dextercioby
Science Advisor
Homework Helper
Insights Author
13,033
588
What's your answer to the question ? Yes or no ?
 
  • #3
188
0
I would say no since the Stefan-Boltzmann law is derived from Planck's law of radiation which was found by Planck using a quantum hypothesis. Or really a bit psuedo-quantum, he didn't realise it himself at the time that he had more or less revolutionised physics.
 
  • #5
188
0
That's interesting, I was not aware that you could derive the Stefan-Boltzmann law classically, without the Planck law of radiation. Well then, the answer is as bigubau noted obivously yes to your question - the law can be derived classically.

However, it seems that a theoretical value of the Stefan-Boltzmann constant [tex]\sigma[/tex] can not be found without the aid of a quantum hypothesis (Planck's radiation law). It can only be measured.
 
  • #6
32
0
Thanks guys
 

Related Threads on HELP! Boltzmann law in terms of classical physics?

  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
4K
Replies
4
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
2
Views
2K
Replies
4
Views
4K
  • Last Post
Replies
3
Views
10K
Replies
4
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
2K
  • Last Post
Replies
1
Views
541
Replies
8
Views
9K
Top