Henry III gold penny found in Devon, UK

  • Thread starter Astronuc
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Gold Uk
In summary, an amateur metal detectorist discovered an 800-year-old gold coin depicting English King Henry III in a farm field in Devon, England. It is considered one of the earliest gold coins found in England and is estimated to sell for $546,000 at an online auction. The coin was minted around 1257 and was made with gold from North Africa. This discovery is reminiscent of the British series "Detectorists," where characters also searched for buried coins and relics. The series, loved by many, served as a source of happiness during the coronavirus pandemic for one Italian viewer.
  • #1
Astronuc
Staff Emeritus
Science Advisor
2023 Award
21,907
6,333

Metal Detectorist Discovers One of England’s Earliest Gold Coins in a Farm Field​

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smar...ield-could-sell-for-half-a-million-180979420/

An amateur metal detectorist unearthed a rare medieval gold coin on farmland in Devon, England, reports Sana Noor Haq for CNN Style. Coin experts speculate the 800-year-old Henry III gold penny could sell for around $546,000 at an online auction set for January 23.

Minted around 1257, the nearly one-inch coin depicts the English king, who ruled from 1216 to 1272, sitting on an ornate throne while holding an orb and scepter. It is considered by experts to be one of the earliest gold coins found in England; only seven other coins of this type are known to exist, per Nadeem Badshah of the Times.
. . .
According to the Times, around 1240, Henry III proclaimed payments to the crown be made in gold rather than silver to fund foreign wars. The pennies were minted around 1257 by https://www.jstor.org/stable/863358?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents with gold from North Africa, writes David Carpenter, professor of medieval history at King’s College London, in the Spink & Son’s catalog.

Henry III, also known as Henry of Winchester, became king of England at nine years old after the death of King John in 1216, reported George Nixon of This Is Money in a 2021 article.

I like the term 'detectorist'. Like an astronomer is a 'star or stellar detectorist', or a experimental particle physicist is a 'particle detectorist'. :smile:
 
  • Like
  • Informative
  • Wow
Likes pinball1970, dlgoff, Klystron and 3 others
Science news on Phys.org
  • #2
Female would be detectorix.
 
  • #3
Astronuc said:
I like the term 'detectorist'.
Puts me in mind of the British series, "Detectorists," staring Mackenzie Crook, Toby Jones, Rachael Stirling. Mackenzie Crook was one of the main actors in the British sitcom "The Office." Rachael Stirling is Diana Riggs's daughter -- Diana Riggs also appeared in the series.
In this series Crook and Jones spent most of their time searching for buried Saxon coins and relics.
I enjoyed the series so much I watched all of the episodes twice.
 
  • Like
Likes PeroK and Astronuc
  • #4
Mark44 said:
Puts me in mind of the British series, "Detectorists," staring Mackenzie Crook, Toby Jones, Rachael Stirling. Mackenzie Crook was one of the main actors in the British sitcom "The Office." Rachael Stirling is Diana Riggs's daughter -- Diana Riggs also appeared in the series.
In this series Crook and Jones spent most of their time searching for buried Saxon coins and relics.
I enjoyed the series so much I watched all of the episodes twice.
I couldn't resist looking for the trailer on YouTube, just to savour a small piece of this minimialist comedy treasure and I found this comment:

Italian native speaker here. A couple of years ago I was looking for TV shows to watch in order to practice my English, and I stumbled upon this gem of a series. I've loved it to bits ever since. When my country was struck by the Coronavirus pandemic there were days in which this masterpiece was the only thing between me and depression. I can't describe how important its "happiness in the little things" message was for me at that time. When all this pandemic business is over I'm writing to mr. Mackenzie Crook to thank him from the bottom of my heart.
 
  • Like
Likes Astronuc
  • #5
Hornbein said:
Female would be detectorix.
A female detector could be called a detectrix; however, there is no feminine version of he 'ist' suffix.
 
  • Like
Likes Mark44
  • #6
Hornbein said:
Female would be detectorix.
Not detectoress? Has a ring to it.
 
  • #7
sysprog said:
A female detector could be called a detectrix; however, there is no feminine version of he 'ist' suffix.
istix, as in detectoristix, or how about detectorista?
 
  • Like
Likes gmax137

What is a Henry III gold penny?

A Henry III gold penny is a coin that was minted during the reign of King Henry III of England, which lasted from 1216 to 1272. It is made of gold and features the image of the king on one side and a cross on the other.

Where was the Henry III gold penny found?

The Henry III gold penny was found in Devon, UK. Specifically, it was discovered in a field near the village of Hemyock in the county of Devon.

How old is the Henry III gold penny?

The Henry III gold penny is over 800 years old, as it was minted during the 13th century.

What is the value of the Henry III gold penny?

The value of the Henry III gold penny can vary depending on its condition and rarity. However, as a historical artifact, it holds significant value to collectors and can potentially be worth thousands of dollars.

What does the discovery of the Henry III gold penny tell us about the history of Devon, UK?

The discovery of the Henry III gold penny in Devon, UK provides evidence of the area's economic and political ties to the rest of England during the 13th century. It also sheds light on the circulation of gold coins during that time period and the importance of trade and commerce in the region.

Similar threads

  • Art, Music, History, and Linguistics
Replies
2
Views
864
Back
Top