High School Chemistry: Stoichiometry Readings?

In summary, Chestermiller suggests reading non-proprietary articles to find examples of real-world applications of stoichiometry.
  • #1
556
34
Hi there, I've taught high school stoichiometry (limiting reactant, theoretical yield, etc) for about a decade now focusing on both math (such as mol reactant to grams product) and related lab techniques (maximizing percent yield). I would like to expand my curriculum with some good readings that demonstrate real world applications of the techniques, and was wondering if anyone here had something interesting.

For example, I explain percent yield is used in industry to decide among different reactions which produce the same product, but I don't really have any interesting historical examples in the form of a engaging article.
 
Science news on Phys.org
  • #2
mishima said:
For example, I explain percent yield is used in industry to decide among different reactions which produce the same product, but I don't really have any interesting historical examples in the form of a engaging article.
Maybe @Chestermiller can direct one to some easy-to-understand articles.

I would expect there are examples from the petroleum, petrochemical and chemical industries. I was thinking of refineries that produce a variety of products, or adjust their process for maximum yield of products like high-octane gasoline.
For example - https://www.intechopen.com/chapters/63586
High-Octane Gasoline Production from Catalytic Naphtha Reforming

Or production of ethylene oxide (oxirane).
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2090447921003506

Or something involving Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis.

I can think of one process regarding the formation of sintered UO2±x, but I don't know of any nonproprietary articles. The sintering atmosphere must be reducing (either with H2 or cracked NH3) with a narrow range of dew point. There are other considerations with respect to additives in the 'green' ceramic and temperature, typically > 1700°C.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Likes mishima
  • #3
Thanks for those suggestions. I should mention I have access to Nature and AAPT journals.
 
  • #4
As undergrads >50 years ago, we used a book entitled Industrial Stoichiometry. However, I am not aware if such a book exists today. Check Amazon. I did, and there are many good books on this subject available there. Also, check the curricula of Chemical Engineering departments at universities and see what books they are currently using.
 
  • Like
Likes Astronuc

What is stoichiometry in high school chemistry?

Stoichiometry is a branch of chemistry that deals with the quantitative relationships between reactants and products in a chemical reaction. It involves using mathematical calculations to determine the amount of substances consumed or produced in a chemical reaction.

What is the purpose of stoichiometry in high school chemistry?

The purpose of stoichiometry is to help students understand the quantitative aspects of chemical reactions and how the amount of each substance involved can affect the outcome of the reaction. It also allows students to predict the amount of products that will be produced based on the reactants.

What are the key concepts of stoichiometry in high school chemistry?

The key concepts of stoichiometry include mole ratios, balancing chemical equations, and using the mole concept to convert between mass and number of particles. It also involves understanding the concept of limiting reactants and theoretical yield, as well as the use of stoichiometric calculations to solve problems.

How is stoichiometry taught in high school chemistry?

Stoichiometry is typically taught through a combination of lecture, problem solving, and hands-on activities. Students are first introduced to the concepts and then given practice problems to solve. They may also conduct experiments to observe the concepts in action. Teachers may also use visual aids, such as diagrams and models, to help students visualize the concepts.

Why is stoichiometry important in high school chemistry?

Stoichiometry is important in high school chemistry because it is the foundation for understanding chemical reactions and their quantitative aspects. It also helps students develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills that are crucial for success in chemistry and other scientific fields.

Suggested for: High School Chemistry: Stoichiometry Readings?

Back
Top