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High Strength Steel with Corrosion Resistance and High Toughness

  1. Aug 10, 2006 #1

    Astronuc

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    I periodically browse the literature for new products. In the August 2006 issue of Advanced Materials & Process (from ASM International), I found an article on a new high strength steel from Carpenter Technology Corp. (Cartech)

    Cartech Custom 465 (find it at www.cartech.com)

    Custom 465 is an alternative to 17-4 PH steel, with more than twice the impact resistance as 17-4 PH

    Composition (w/o)

    Cr: 11-12.5
    Ni: 10.8-11.3
    Mo: 0.8-1.2
    Ti: 1.5-1.8
    Fe: bal

    See US Patents: 5681528, 5855844

    - Marine engine shafts
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2006
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  3. Aug 11, 2006 #2

    Gokul43201

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    Holy cow - 250 ksi in a stainless? That's like a maraging steel!! Amazing!
     
  4. Aug 11, 2006 #3

    PerennialII

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    :bugeye: ..... got to get some of that and try how it breaks & fails.
     
  5. Aug 11, 2006 #4

    FredGarvin

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    I've used a fair amount of the custom alloys, especially 450. 465 has been around a bit. MMPDS has it listed in it's references, but the predescessor, MIL-HDBK-5H didn't.

    I really wonder what they were thinking of when making a highly loaded shaft out of 17-4. That is not the best pick, especially with splines. My first selection would have been Inco 718.
     
  6. Aug 11, 2006 #5

    Astronuc

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    Composition and thermo-mechanical processing.

    I don't know how well 718 would have held up in seawater.

    I was wondering wondering how well AL-6XN® alloy (UNS N08367) would do. This is a specialty steel by Allegheny Ludlum for marine applications like landing gear on naval aircraft.
     
  7. Aug 12, 2006 #6

    FredGarvin

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    A lot of our shafts are 718 and they have to survive operating is salty environments. However they get the advantage of not having been completely immersed constantly over a period of time. I think I'll have to look into that part.
     
  8. Feb 4, 2009 #7

    I wonder how the fabrication characteristics of 465 compare to 17-4 , in terms of shrinkage and warping during heat treat?
     
  9. Feb 5, 2009 #8

    Astronuc

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