Hospitalized COVID-19 Brain Damage greater than in Alzheimers....

In summary, Covid-19 patients showed more signs of brain damage than people with Alzheimer's disease. The markers were elevated to levels observed in AD dementia and associated with encephalopathy and worse outcomes among hospitalized COVID-19 patients. There was no difference between vaxed and unvaxed on brain fog recovery rates.
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  • #3
Hmm... true. What other things could cause the markers to rise?
 
  • #4
Maybe it reflects a beginning or incipiency of a similar kind of damage, which is arrested when the infected person recovers from the virus.
 
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  • #5
That would seem the best-case scenario, here's hoping!
 
  • #6
Yes. A less bright-side possibility is that the elevated markers may be found to be associated with 'post-COVID brain fog', and that may be indicative of damage to the hippocampus and other neural structures. While most patients appear to fully recover from the 'brain fog' in about 3 months or sooner, for a comparative few, it apparently can last much longer. There are some infected in 2020 who still report lingering symptoms of it.
 
  • #7
sysprog said:
Yes. A less bright-side possibility is that the elevated markers may be found to be associated with 'post-COVID brain fog', and that may be indicative of damage to the hippocampus and other neural structures. While most patients appear to fully recover from the 'brain fog' in about 3 months or sooner, for a comparative few, it apparently can last much longer. There are some infected in 2020 who still report lingering symptoms of it.
Any difference between vaxed and unvaxed on brain fog recovery rates?
 
  • #8
As far as I know, the generality that symptoms encountered by vaccinated persons are very likely to be fewer and less severe would apply regarding 'brain fog', too.
 
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  • #9
as of 1/17/2022:
I am unaware of any reasonable studies on how long Covid (PASC) rates associate with vaccination status. So I think it is fair to say 'we do not know'. There does appear to be a correlation between PASC onset and severe symptoms. Overview:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8525917/

Autopsies do show the presence of the SARS virus in many different organ tissues, including brain tissue. Obviously, death interferes with PASC determinations made in the morgue. A study on living people shows brain damage:
Thanks to @Tom.G
https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.06.11.21258690v1
-- Pre and post Covid brain imaging data.
 
  • #10
Wow ##-## that study says that about 1/3 of patients get some observable permanent cortical damage ##-## makes me wonder whether SARS-CoV-2 could shave a little off of worldwide IQ normings. :oops:
 
  • #11
@Tom.G - markers are usually molecules: polypeptides/proteins

One example:

C reactive protein (CRP) is a marker for current , usually ongoing inflammation. And is usually a harbinger for impending new problems. So patients may be monitored periodically for it. Usually along with other biomarkers.

So we can say:
Patients with a high risk profile for Cardiovascular disease usually have elevated CRP. Any increase may signal impending new problems. Cardiovascular diseases are usually an inflammation mediated disease process. So it is a heredity/environment interaction.

See this patient guide:
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/hea...g-cardiovascular-risk-with-c-reactive-protein
 
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Related to Hospitalized COVID-19 Brain Damage greater than in Alzheimers....

1. What is the cause of COVID-19 brain damage in hospitalized patients?

The exact cause of COVID-19 brain damage in hospitalized patients is still being studied and is not fully understood. However, it is believed that the virus can directly infect brain cells, leading to inflammation and damage. Additionally, the body's immune response to the virus can also cause damage to brain tissue.

2. How common is brain damage in hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared to those with Alzheimer's disease?

According to recent studies, brain damage is more common in hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared to those with Alzheimer's disease. One study found that 55% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients had neurological symptoms, while Alzheimer's disease affects about 10% of people over the age of 65. However, more research is needed to fully understand the extent of brain damage in COVID-19 patients.

3. What are the symptoms of COVID-19 brain damage?

The symptoms of COVID-19 brain damage can vary, but commonly reported symptoms include confusion, difficulty concentrating, memory loss, headaches, and dizziness. In more severe cases, patients may experience seizures, strokes, or coma. It is important to note that these symptoms can also be caused by other factors, so a thorough medical evaluation is necessary for a proper diagnosis.

4. Can COVID-19 brain damage be treated or reversed?

Currently, there is no specific treatment for COVID-19 brain damage. However, medical professionals can provide supportive care to manage symptoms and prevent further damage. In some cases, rehabilitation therapy may also be recommended to help patients regain lost function. It is important to seek medical attention as soon as possible to increase the chances of successful treatment.

5. Are there any long-term effects of COVID-19 brain damage?

The long-term effects of COVID-19 brain damage are still being studied, but it is possible that some patients may experience lasting cognitive or neurological impairments. It is important for patients to receive follow-up care and monitoring to assess any potential long-term effects and provide appropriate treatment. Additionally, ongoing research is needed to fully understand the long-term impact of COVID-19 on the brain.

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