How expensive are satellite fuels?

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In summary, the cost of satellite fuels and cryogens is relatively low compared to other costs involved in space missions. The cost is dominated by the lift cost of $5-10,000 per kilogram. Hydrazine is a commonly used fuel for satellite micro thrusts and can be purchased for around $2000 per metric tonne from industrial suppliers. Liquid hydrogen is another option, but has issues with containment.
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member 428835
Does anyone know how expensive satellite fuels and or cryogens are? If so, could you supply the source? If not, do you have any recommendations where I could look (I've googled and google-scholared things like "satellite fuel cost" but to no avail).

Thanks!
 
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Search on the actual substance names . Hydrazine , liquid oxygen , helium etc .

Generally though the actual cost of chemical fuels , coolants and pressurising agents is trivial compared to the other costs involved in any space mission .
 
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The cost is dominated by the lift cost of $5-10,000 per kilogram.
 
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joshmccraney said:
Does anyone know how expensive satellite fuels and or cryogens are? If so, could you supply the source? If not, do you have any recommendations where I could look (I've googled and google-scholared things like "satellite fuel cost" but to no avail).

Thanks!

Not going to be a lot of information out there, especially for some fuels. Why not email the public relations division of a commercial satellite manufacturer like Space Systems/Loral. They might be able to share a ball park figure with you.
 
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joshmccraney said:
Does anyone know how expensive satellite fuels and or cryogens are? If so, could you supply the source? If not, do you have any recommendations where I could look (I've googled and google-scholared things like "satellite fuel cost" but to no avail).
Can you say why you are asking? Are you looking at making your own small-scale liquid-fueled rocket? Have you experimented with solid fuel hobby rocketry in the past? :smile:
 
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Thanks for the responses!

hahaha Berkeman, I'm afraid I'm not nearly that cool:frown:

I'm writing a grant proposal and this would be helpful information. It's not necessary, but it would be nice to know. The proposal relates to capillary fluids in low-g environments, so not rocketry. Thanks for the response though!
 
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Vanadium 50 said:
The cost is dominated by the lift cost of $5-10,000 per kilogram.
Can you provide a citation for this info?
 
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joshmccraney said:
Can you provide a citation for this info?

Google cost per kilogram to LEO. 325,000 results.
 
  • #9
Once a satellite is in orbit, it can in some cases be reconfigured when needed by short burns of micro thrusters.
Typically these use Hydrazine, which gives a lot of bang for the buck and is fairly light weight.
Hydrazine of itself-is not really expensive, a quick googled revealed industrial suppliers at around $2000 for a metric tonne.
Liquid hydrogen could be used, but that has problems with containment.
 

Related to How expensive are satellite fuels?

1. How are satellite fuels priced?

The price of satellite fuels is determined by various factors, including the type of fuel used, the amount of fuel needed, and the cost of launching the satellite into orbit. Additionally, the price may also be affected by market demand and supply.

2. How much does it cost to fuel a satellite?

The cost of fueling a satellite depends on the size and type of satellite, as well as the distance it needs to travel. On average, the cost of satellite fuel can range from tens of thousands to millions of dollars.

3. How often do satellites need to be refueled?

The frequency of satellite refueling depends on the type of satellite and its mission. Some satellites, such as those in geostationary orbit, may never need to be refueled, while others in lower orbits may need to be refueled every few years.

4. Can satellites use alternative fuels?

Yes, there are ongoing efforts to develop and use alternative fuels for satellites, such as solar power, nuclear power, and electric propulsion. These fuels may reduce the cost and environmental impact of satellite launches.

5. Are there any regulations on satellite fuel usage?

Yes, there are regulations in place to ensure the safe and responsible use of satellite fuels. These regulations may include restrictions on the types and quantities of fuels that can be used, as well as guidelines for the disposal of used fuels in space.

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