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How is electrical current delivered into houses?

  1. Dec 27, 2015 #1
    How is the potential difference done? How do they make electrons move? Do they use electrical field using positive (to atract them) or negative charges (to repel them)?

    Do they use variables magnetic fields?
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2015
  2. jcsd
  3. Dec 27, 2015 #2

    SteamKing

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    What research have you done to answer your own question?
     
  4. Dec 27, 2015 #3
    The potential differences on the wires to a house come from transformers. The secondary side is wound on a core of iron. The magnetization direction in this core is changing 50 or 60 times per second, and this causes the potential difference. It is called induction.

    The primary side of the transformer is also a coil, which is connected to an alternating current. This is the cause of the magnetic field, an electromagnet.

    Which is connected via other transformers to a generator, often a coil physically rotating in a magnetic field. More or less like a bicycle dynamo.
     
  5. Dec 27, 2015 #4
    I suppose it might be difficult to find the answer to this kind of question with a search engine. One would probably need to go to the library and get a book at the appropriate level. But how to choose the appropriate level?
     
  6. Dec 27, 2015 #5

    SteamKing

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    You don't know for sure if you don't try. Libraries are so TwenCen.

    It's not like the internet started last Tuesday. A simple Google search on "electric power distribution" turns up about 25 million hits. :wink:
     
  7. Dec 27, 2015 #6

    jim hardy

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  8. Dec 28, 2015 #7

    sophiecentaur

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    If your knowledge is very elementary, it may be best to look at School (possibly College) revision sites. BBC Bytesize has loads of stuff which could help - if it's too elementary then you can always move on.
    There can be difficulties if you just google "Power Distribution" because you can be drowned in specialist techy stuff which assumes a high level of EE knowledge.
    There's a skill in effective searching and here's an example where the OP needs to do personal research because he/she is the only one who knows what's the appropriate level. Note: It is necessary to be familiar with elementary DC / resistor circuits before Mains Electricity will make much sense so you need to start with basics and not try to jump too far ahead. That can easily cause confusion in such a formal subject.
    It is a good idea not to include "Electrons" in descriptions of Electricity. It really does no good and most EEs go months and months between occasions when they bring Electrons into any of their work. (Strange and annoying - but true)
     
  9. Dec 28, 2015 #8

    sophiecentaur

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    That could be fine if the OP is in the US. It will cause a mental breakdown if the OP lives in Europe. :))
     
  10. Dec 28, 2015 #9
    The OP seems to know some basics (is asking what causes the "potential difference"). Probably learned to deal with circuits with batteries. Then it is a very good question to ask how this is with mains electricity. But beyond uttering the words "electromagnetic induction", there is not much I could explain. (Which is because I do not really know...)
     
  11. Dec 29, 2015 #10

    sophiecentaur

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    You could well be right but, as Old Jim always says "A question well asked is almost answered" (or words to that effect).
    Very hard when there is confusion in one's mind about a topic. We are all frequently in the same position.
     
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