How long would it take for a block of ice to melt in the sun?

  • Thread starter RajdeepSingh7
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In summary, the sun would have to provide 600 Joules of energy per square meter per second in order to warm the ice block from -6°C to 28°C. This process would take 5.158 minutes.
  • #1
RajdeepSingh7
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I was wondering if it would be possible to get help with this question:

A 400 gram block of ice at -6°C is allowed to warm to room temperature which is 28°C.

If the sun provides 600 Joules of energy per square meter per second and all this energy was used to warm the ice block, calculate how long it would take to warm the ice block to 28°C.
If there was one square meter of surface exposed to the sun for this purpose.


Any contributions will be appreciated

Thanks :smile:
 
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  • #2
Welcome to PF RajdeepSingh7,

Before you can receive assistance, you must show us what you have attempted thus far.
 
  • #3
Would we have to find the total energy required by using the Specific Heat Capacity?

And then calculate the Time?
 
  • #4
RajdeepSingh7 said:
Would we have to find the total energy required by using the Specific Heat Capacity?

And then calculate the Time?
Assuming that this process occurs at atmospheric pressure, one would also have to account for the latent heat.
 
  • #5
Answer+Check

A 400 gram block of ice at -6°C is allowed to warm to room temperature which is 28°C.

Calculate the net amount of energy that had to flow into the block for this to happen. The following data will assist your calculation:

Specific heat capacity of liquid water = 4200 J Kg K
Latent Heat of fusion of ice : 3.34 x 10^5 JKg
Specific heat capacity of Ice = 2.10 x 10^3 JKg K


If the sun provides 600 Joules of energy per square meter per second and all this energy was used to warm the ice block, calculate how long it would take to warm the ice block to 28°C.
If there was one square meter of surface exposed to the sun for this purpose.



1)

Warming of Ice from -6C to 0C, Specific Heat:
Change Temperature = 6C
c=2.10 x 10^3
m = 0.4
Energy Transferred ( Q) = mc Change in T
Energy Transferred ( Q) = 0.4 x 2.10 x 10^3 x 6
Energy Transferred ( Q) = 5040 J


2)

Melting the Ice from 0C to 0C, Latent Heat of Fusion:

Lf=3.34 x 10^5
m = 0.4
Energy Transferred ( Q) = m x Lf
Energy Transferred ( Q) = 0.4 x 3.34 x 10^5
Energy Transferred ( Q) = 133600 J

3)

Warming of Water from 0C to 28C, Specific Heat:
Change Temperature = 28C
c=4200
m = 0.4
Energy Transferred ( Q) = mc Change in T
Energy Transferred ( Q) = 0.4 x 4200 x 28
Energy Transferred ( Q) = 47040J


4)

Total Energy Required : 5040 J + 133600 J + 47040J = 185680 J


Part B ))

185680 J divided by 600 J

185680 / 600 = 309.437 Seconds

309.437 Seconds / 60 = 5.158 Minutes

Please Check My Answer and My Working Out!
 

1. How does energy affect the melting of an ice block?

Energy is required to melt an ice block because it changes the solid ice into liquid water. In order for the ice molecules to break apart and move freely, energy must be added to overcome the strong forces between them.

2. What type of energy is involved in the melting process?

The energy involved in melting an ice block is thermal energy, also known as heat. Heat is transferred from the surroundings to the ice block, causing the molecules to gain energy and break apart.

3. Can energy be transferred from the ice to the surroundings during melting?

Yes, during the melting process, some of the energy is transferred from the ice to the surrounding environment. This is because the ice molecules lose energy as they break apart and become liquid water, which then transfers to the surroundings.

4. How does the temperature affect the melting rate of an ice block?

The temperature of the surroundings plays a significant role in the melting rate of an ice block. The higher the temperature, the faster the ice will melt, as more thermal energy is transferred to the ice, causing the molecules to move and break apart more quickly.

5. Can the melting of an ice block be reversed?

Yes, the melting of an ice block can be reversed by removing the thermal energy from the liquid water and lowering its temperature. This will cause the water molecules to lose energy and form bonds with each other, turning back into solid ice.

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