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I How subparticles can be seen

  1. Oct 16, 2016 #1
    If we shine visible light on a electron (or place it on a electric field), the electron would re-emit that visible light so that we can see it. Not directly with our eyes, because its high velocity, but maybe with a sophisticated camera. Why is it not possible?

    And Im sorry for my poor English
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2016
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 16, 2016 #2

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    This is called Thomson scattering
     
  4. Oct 16, 2016 #3
    Then where can I find a real image of an electron ?
     
  5. Oct 16, 2016 #4

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

    On the face of a Cathode Ray Tube... :smile:
     
  6. Oct 16, 2016 #5

    berkeman

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    Staff: Mentor

  7. Oct 16, 2016 #6

    Dale

    Staff: Mentor

    What can you tell me about photography. What can you tell me about Thomson scattering? Think it through a bit. Research CCD detectors and their sensitivity. Research the thermal speed of a typical electron. Then try to answer your own question.
     
  8. Oct 17, 2016 #7
    Oh cool. Is there a link to some website to a image of an electron captured either by STM or CCD on internet? And I was wondering if in the Compton Scattering it's possible to cause the electron to emit visible light if we drop visible light on it and the scattered photon is emitted at an angle of 0°. Is it possible?
     
  9. Oct 17, 2016 #8
  10. Oct 17, 2016 #9
  11. Oct 17, 2016 #10
    Ridiculous!... Is a white patch on a black and white photograph an 'image of a photon'
     
  12. Oct 17, 2016 #11
    I was expecting to see something like a point particle as the electrons are presented in textbooks
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2016
  13. Oct 17, 2016 #12
    If a photon hits your eye, it will excite some rod or cone in your retina. I think it takes many photons to excite the retinal cell to a level where it "registers". So you'll get some point spread due to the fact that you have a distribution of many photons hitting many points in your eye.

    As far as various fast particles hitting your eye -- maybe you'll see some blue glow due to ionizations in your vitreous matter. And you probably should get out of there.
     
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