How to calculate the calories burnt during walking

  • #26
BvU
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Yes but. It's a useless answer. If I get up from my chair, my center of mass goes up by approx 0.3 m. That corresponds to 300 J. Easy physics: ##E = mg\Delta h## . Your 37 J is peanuts -- furthermore it applies for 1 hour, but also for 1 minute or 1 second or for a whole day, for that matter.

Better to just grab a source and use it -- while mentioning which source you refer to in your reporting.

[edit] this was in reply to #20 (I'm slow).

Treadmill is an exercise apparatus, for which see post #3
 
  • #27
Andy Resnick
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Thank you Perok and Resnik,
I think the question is recoined to get a straight uncomplicated answer
"how to calculate the energy for an object weighing 60 kg to move in a frictionless surface at a speed of 4 kmh–1 for 1 hour and by assuming without the influence of any external factors" In that case may I use
=1/2 × 60 kg × (4000/3600 ms–1)2 ~ 37 J
Sure, that's the energy you need to provide the object to accelerate it from rest to 4 km/h on a frictionless surface. The amount of time it spends sliding is then irrelevant- it will continue along at 4 km/h as long as it remains on a frictionless surface (that is also flat, if gravity is present).
 
  • #28
704
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Just coming in to chime in that basic physics is entirely useless to calculate caloric consumption. As an example, with pure physical considerations, holding a 100lb weight on your extended arm for an hour consumes zero energy. Zero.
What consumes all the energy are the muscles in your arms that aren't good at staying flexed. To do so they consume energy stored in your cells, and that's where the calories are burned. But that's biology. From a physical, i.e. mechanical standpoint, you did absolutely nothing.
 
  • #29
15
0
Yes but. It's a useless answer. If I get up from my chair, my center of mass goes up by approx 0.3 m. That corresponds to 300 J. Easy physics: ##E = mg\Delta h## . Your 37 J is peanuts -- furthermore it applies for 1 hour, but also for 1 minute or 1 second or for a whole day, for that matter.

Better to just grab a source and use it -- while mentioning which source you refer to in your reporting.

[edit] this was in reply to #20 (I'm slow).

Treadmill is an exercise apparatus, for which see post #3
Yes but. It's a useless answer. If I get up from my chair, my center of mass goes up by approx 0.3 m. That corresponds to 300 J. Easy physics: ##E = mg\Delta h## . Your 37 J is peanuts -- furthermore it applies for 1 hour, but also for 1 minute or 1 second or for a whole day, for that matter.

Better to just grab a source and use it -- while mentioning which source you refer to in your reporting.

[edit] this was in reply to #20 (I'm slow).

Treadmill is an exercise apparatus, for which see post #3
Thank you BvU, I referred many online calculators.
Source1
Source2
Source3
Source4
 
  • #30
125
11
while on walking our body COG moves vertically some 1-1.5inches -for every step- ie the potential energy of our body increases- by body weight (N)x 40/1000(m) j- this requires energy +metabolism, etc,
 

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