How-to-DIY-a-Flat-Screen-Projector

In summary, the speaker is seeking advice on how to create a projection on a flat surface using an LCD screen, translucent paper, a Fresnel lens, and an LED light source. They are wondering if the light passing through the lens and LCD will produce a clear image on the paper. They have attached a visual representation of their proposed setup and are looking for a cost-effective solution. The suggested method is to place the Fresnel lens between the LCD and paper to focus the image rather than the light source. The speaker also suggests determining the focal distance of the lens for optimal results. They provide a link to a DIY tutorial for creating a flat screen projector.
  • #1
jearl
1
0
Hi,
I'm trying to create a projection on a flat surface by using an LCD screen extracted from a flat panel monitor, a sheet of translucent fine grain paper, a Fresnel lens and an LED light source. The purpose is to project a focused image on the paper for display proposes.

The idea is to have the image projected from underneath the paper or rear projection. I'm wondering if anyone here would know if the light from the source passing through a Fresnel lens then through the LCD will produce a clear image on the paper. At first I thought that this might fall in the category of lens effects but I'm not sure. I've attached a descriptive image of the proposed set up.

I know this may seem impractical but, this setup would keep my cost down for the project.

Thank you for your help.
 

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  • #2
You probably want to put the Fresnel lens between the LCD and the paper. You don't want to focus the light source, but the image of the LCD. If you know the focal distance of the lens, you can easily figure out what distances you need.
 
  • #3

What is a Table Top Projection Project?

A Table Top Projection Project is a scientific experiment or demonstration that involves projecting images or videos onto a flat surface, such as a table, using a projector. This allows for interactive learning and visualization of concepts in a hands-on manner.

What materials are needed for a Table Top Projection Project?

The materials needed for a Table Top Projection Project may vary depending on the specific experiment or demonstration. However, some common materials include a projector, a flat surface (such as a table or whiteboard), a laptop or computer, and any necessary cables or adapters to connect the projector to the computer.

What are the benefits of using a Table Top Projection Project?

There are many benefits to using a Table Top Projection Project in a scientific setting. It allows for visual and interactive learning, making complex concepts easier to understand. It also encourages collaboration and can be used for group activities. Additionally, it can save time and resources compared to traditional methods of teaching or demonstrating scientific concepts.

What types of experiments or demonstrations can be done with a Table Top Projection Project?

A Table Top Projection Project can be used for a wide range of experiments and demonstrations in various scientific fields, such as physics, chemistry, biology, and astronomy. It can be used to demonstrate concepts like light and shadow, chemical reactions, cell division, and planetary movements.

Are there any safety concerns when conducting a Table Top Projection Project?

As with any scientific experiment, safety should always be a top priority. When using a Table Top Projection Project, it is important to ensure that the projector and all cables are in good working condition to prevent any accidents. Additionally, proper safety precautions should be taken when handling any materials or substances used in the experiment.

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