How to Measure and Calculate Band Gap of a Photovoltaic Device

In summary, the device should be able to generate current when illuminated with monochromatic light if the PV cell band gap voltage is known.
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tornado
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Hi there!

I bought a photovoltaic cell. I would like to learn its band gap at 300 K and 0 K. How can i measure band gap or calculate? I have already measured Temperature to Vmax values.

I couldn't find any good information about this topic.

Thanks.
 
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Thank you so much! But i can't find a monochromatic light. Is there any different option? I tested this device with temperature. Its like a thermophotovoltaic.
 
  • #4
tornado said:
Thank you so much! But i can't find a monochromatic light. Is there any different option? I tested this device with temperature. Its like a thermophotovoltaic.
Interesting, the first time I ever heard of these things.

It seems you can assume a black-body spectral distribution from the source. As the temperature is increased there will be an output current that should be the product of the two transfer functions; blackbody radiation times diode spectral response. With enough temperature data points I would think you could do something like a correlation calculation to model the diode response required to match the data. As the temperature is increased, you should see a current increase that is more rapid than the blackbody distribution could explain, this would be from the diode "turning on". However, you would need a good experimental setup and some modelling assumptions, and then you still might get a pretty sloppy result.

How about just calling the manufacturer and asking?
 

Related to How to Measure and Calculate Band Gap of a Photovoltaic Device

1. What is a band gap in a photovoltaic device?

A band gap in a photovoltaic device is the energy difference between the valence band (highest energy level occupied by electrons) and the conduction band (lowest energy level available for electrons to move) in the material. It determines the energy of the photons that can be absorbed by the device, and thus affects its efficiency in converting light into electricity.

2. How do you measure the band gap of a photovoltaic device?

The band gap of a photovoltaic device can be measured using various techniques such as photoluminescence, absorption spectroscopy, and current-voltage measurements. These methods involve shining light of different energies on the device and measuring the resulting electrical or optical response. The band gap can then be calculated using mathematical equations.

3. What factors can affect the band gap of a photovoltaic device?

The band gap of a photovoltaic device can be affected by various factors such as the material composition, crystal structure, and temperature. The band gap also depends on the type of semiconductor used, with direct band gap semiconductors having a higher efficiency in converting light into electricity compared to indirect band gap semiconductors.

4. How is the band gap related to the efficiency of a photovoltaic device?

The band gap is directly related to the efficiency of a photovoltaic device. A smaller band gap allows for the absorption of a wider range of photon energies, resulting in a higher efficiency in converting light into electricity. However, a band gap that is too small can also lead to losses due to recombination of electrons and holes, reducing the efficiency of the device.

5. Can the band gap of a photovoltaic device be changed?

Yes, the band gap of a photovoltaic device can be changed by altering the material composition or structure. This can be achieved through techniques such as doping, where impurities are intentionally added to the material to modify its electronic properties. Changing the band gap can also affect the efficiency of the device, making it an important consideration in the design and optimization of photovoltaic devices.

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