How to solve this network of resistors for equivalent resistance?

In summary, the conversation discusses the potential of points in a schematic circuit and whether the placement of resistors in parallel would affect the overall resistance. The suggestion is made to replace a straight segment with multiple segments in the shape of the letter H and tie the resistors on either side to the corresponding sides of the H. This leads to the conclusion that the resistors are indeed in parallel and the equivalent resistance is 4 ohm. Thanks for the help.
  • #1
Homework Statement
The question asks to find the equivalent resistance for this group of resistors in a network.
Relevant Equations
I used Ohm's law and parallel and series combination to solve it, but don't know where to start. I thought about using Kirchoff's laws, but still I can't find the answer.
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  • #2
Did you spot any resistors that are in parallel?
 
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  • #3
Straight segment AB looks like the letter I. Would anything change if you replaced it with more straight segments that look like the letter H and tied the two resistors on the left to the left side of the H and likewise for the right side?

Remember, the convention is that, in a schematic circuit, any point on a straight line segment is at the same potential as any other point as long as there are no circuit elements, e.g. resistors, batteries, etc., in between.
 
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  • #4
kuruman said:
Straight segment AB looks like the letter I. Would anything change if you replaced it with more straight segments that look like the letter H and tied the two resistors on the left to the left side of the H and likewise for the right side?

Remember, the convention is that, in a schematic circuit, any point on a straight line segment is at the same potential as any other point as long as there are no circuit elements, e.g. resistors, batteries, etc., in between.
Thanks for the reply!
Going through your suggestion, I think PA and PB are in parallel, and QA and QB are also in parallel. Solving them would lead to 2 ohm on each side of AB in series. And the equivalent resistance would be 4 ohm.
I got the answer! Thanks for the help.
 
  • #5
gneill said:
Did you spot any resistors that are in parallel?
Yes, now I able to separate them in parallel circuits.
Thanks for the reply!
 

1. How do I calculate the equivalent resistance of a network of resistors?

The equivalent resistance of a network of resistors can be calculated using two methods: the series method and the parallel method. The series method involves adding all the resistors in the network to find the total resistance, while the parallel method involves using the formula 1/Req = 1/R1 + 1/R2 + ... + 1/Rn, where Req is the equivalent resistance and R1, R2, etc. are the individual resistances.

2. What is the difference between series and parallel resistors?

In a series circuit, the resistors are connected one after the other, so the current passing through each resistor is the same. In a parallel circuit, the resistors are connected side by side, so the voltage across each resistor is the same. Additionally, in a series circuit, the equivalent resistance is the sum of all the individual resistances, while in a parallel circuit, the equivalent resistance is less than the smallest individual resistance.

3. Can I use Ohm's Law to solve a network of resistors?

Yes, Ohm's Law can be used to solve a network of resistors. However, it is important to note that Ohm's Law only applies to series circuits, so it cannot be used to solve parallel circuits. In a series circuit, Ohm's Law states that the current (I) is equal to the voltage (V) divided by the resistance (R), or I = V/R.

4. How do I determine the equivalent resistance if the resistors are connected in a combination of series and parallel?

If the resistors in a network are connected in a combination of series and parallel, you can use a combination of the series and parallel methods to calculate the equivalent resistance. Start by simplifying the series and parallel sections separately, then combine the simplified sections to find the overall equivalent resistance.

5. Can I use a calculator to solve a network of resistors?

Yes, you can use a calculator to solve a network of resistors. However, it is important to use the correct formula and pay attention to the units of measurement. It is also a good idea to double-check your calculations to ensure accuracy.

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