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B I would like to learn more about magnetic compression

  1. Aug 24, 2016 #1
    Hello everyone,
    I am chad hale. I am a student at Mesa Community College.
    I have learned that there is no insulation for magnetic lines of flux. I understand the Meissner effect; super cooled metals passing through a transition stage becoming super conducting. I understand that lines of flux never cross and as the lines radiate outward they spread apart.
    I would like to learn more about magnetic compression, and the super diamagnetic properties of annealed pyrolytic graphene (χ = −4×10−4) against the cleavage plane, exhibiting the greatest diamagnetism (by weight) of any room-temperature diamagnet. I wonder if this material can be applied to improve electromagnetic motors. Instead of brass, use a sheath of annealed pyrolytic graphene around the motor. I would guess that this could compress the magnetic field and increase the density of the magnetic field.
    I would love to experiment with this to see if the output/efficiencies of electromagnetic motors can be improved.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 25, 2016 #2

    berkeman

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    Welcome to the PF, Chad.

    If you have technical questions, please post them in the appropriate technical sub-forum here, and post links to the reading you have been doing so far. We don't help with personal theory development here, but we are pretty good at answering your technical questions about mainstream science. :smile:

    EDIT -- I see Greg has moved your thread to the General Physics forum for you. Please post some links to the reading you have been doing, and it would help if you could post a sketch of what you are asking about.
     
  4. Aug 28, 2016 #3
    I am going to experiment with annealed pyrolytic graphene, in an effort to improve electromagnetic motors/generators. This is not a flight of fancy or spindizzy space drive. I have heard that magnetic field compression exists. I would like to learn more about it, but the textbooks and internet are not very forthcoming.
    From what my professors mentioned off hand, "The iron core of a stator compresses an electromagnetic motor's field. Magnetic field lines would rather travel through the iron rather than empty space, as this path requires a lower energy state."

    So, can someone inform me with some detail about "Magnetic compression" and its role in today's technology?
     
  5. Sep 6, 2016 #4
    uhm... hello?
     
  6. Sep 6, 2016 #5

    berkeman

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  7. Sep 6, 2016 #6

    sophiecentaur

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    Hello.
    I have googled "Magnetic Compression" and, as I suspected, all the hits seem to be about compressing / containing plasmas. You were asked for a reference and I think that will be necessary before you will get a useful answer.
     
  8. Sep 6, 2016 #7
    No sir, those items are a tad above my pay grade. Thank you for the links I will do what I can to study these with great intent.
    My goal is to find a way to improve an electromagnetic motor.

    I am working towards purchasing materials needed to conduct an experiment; testing the diamagnetic effect of pyrolytic carbon on such motors.
    My method is simple, a horse power test of Em motors (dc/ac, three phase and so forth) without and with the carbon sheath.

    After a quick read of the provided links, I am not sure the direction you are hinting at, possibly a Halbach array motor? I admit that something akin to this is my goal, only I find the application of a graphene sheath to potentially be a cost effective alternative. This is the purpose of my planned experiments. Once I have data proving "Yea" or "Nae" only then would I try to complete the scientific method steps; including peer review. Only after I have a working prototype would I seek a patent.

    Saddly, I am limited in my efforts by my education; which is why I seek elucidation.
     
  9. Sep 6, 2016 #8
    I as well, and the vast majority of results were linked to hokum about the healing powers of magnetism. I had tried a "Scholarly" article search but anything remotely interesting is behind a pay wall, and of questionable merit.
     
  10. Sep 6, 2016 #9
    At the minimum, the application of this material could prevent magneto-strictive damage, or shield components from EMP related harm, (say Satelies vs. solar flares). this isn't the focus of my experiment though.
     
  11. Sep 6, 2016 #10

    berkeman

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    So you are looking into wrapping the magnetic path materials and coils in a diamagnetic material to try to further lower leaking of the magnetic field? Interesting approach. I haven't seen it before, but perhaps others have heard of this approach...
     
  12. Sep 6, 2016 #11
    I am uncertain as I don't possess that vocabulary (I will study magnetic leaking), yet. Would trying to add compression to an electric motor in an effort to improve the output be an apt description of what you wrote? if so, then yes. As this method doesn't require supercooled cyronic liquids/gasses, nor exotic magnet arrays, the weight and output efficiency might be improved over that of other designs. (Experiments need to be conducted first).
     
  13. Sep 6, 2016 #12
    "Magnetic leakage can be defined as the passage of magnetic flux outside the path along which it can do useful work." I believe I am using this definition rather than the "nondestructive inspection method" promoted by wiki.

    If magnetic leakage could be eliminated, cheaply, without cumbersome additions (liquid gas tanks, radiators, condensors, expanders, compressors, etc. required for superconductors or the need to fabricate Halbach arrays)... well, this might be a worthy goal.
     
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