If Up to You, Would You Live in Natural Disaster Prone Area?

In summary, it's up to each individual to decide whether or not they want to live in an area that is prone to natural disasters.
  • #71
This sounds like a good idea, although there are probably a lot of technical obstacles. I ask myself similar questions when I watch the tornado season. Why don't they build stronger houses? Beginning with bricks instead of wood, deeper fundaments, and so on.
 
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  • #72
fresh_42 said:
This sounds like a good idea, although there are probably a lot of technical obstacles. I ask myself similar questions when I watch the tornado season. Why don't they build stronger houses? Beginning with bricks instead of wood, deeper fundaments, and so on.
I was recently in Florida, near where the hurricane went.
The owners of the bed and breakfast I stayed at were very interested in stronger houses. Some there are built that way and theirs was one of those. They also have clever things like window shades that can close down over the windows to protect them (instead of putting up plywood sheets over windows for each storm) and very strong impact resistant glass for windows similar to auto windshields.
Much can be engineered if there is enough desire for it.
 
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  • #74
fresh_42 said:
Why don't they build stronger houses? Beginning with bricks instead of wood, deeper fundaments, and so on.

I live in Port St Lucie about 100 miles north of Miami. All new construction seems to use 8x8x16 inch cinder blocks for outside walls with either metal shutters or high-impact windows. Roofs are standard construction
2x4 trusses covered with 7/16 plywood, membrane underlayment, and either asphalt shingles or metal roofing although the roofs are more securely fastened to the walls.

Additionally, although much of the city is more than fifteen feet above sea level many houses seem to be elevated a few feet above the street level and have small swales by the street that empty into larger swales or canals with lower elevations carrying the water to the St. Lucie river.
 
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  • #75
gleem said:
I live in Port St Lucie about 100 miles north of Miami. All new construction seems to use 8x8x16 inch cinder blocks for outside walls with either metal shutters or high-impact windows. Roofs are standard construction
2x4 trusses covered with 7/16 plywood, membrane underlayment, and either asphalt shingles or metal roofing although the roofs are more securely fastened to the walls.

Additionally, although much of the city is more than fifteen feet above sea level many houses seem to be elevated a few feet above the street level and have small swales by the street that empty into larger swales or canals with lower elevations carrying the water to the St. Lucie river.
Interesting. Sounds decent.

But, what about lower-income/cheaper housing? Same sturdy materials?
 
  • #76
Vanadium 50 said:
Let's see whether I get this right for the US:

  • East and Gulf coasts of the US. Can't live there because of hurricanes.
  • West of the Rockies - can't live there because of earthquakes,.
  • Midwest - earthquakes again: the New Madrid fault.
  • Upper Midwest: Blizzards and Floods.
  • Hawaii - Volcanoes.
  • West Texas: Rednecks
What is left?
Maryland.
 
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  • #77
OscarCP said:
Maryland.
I'm moving there soon! 🤓

-Dan
 
  • #78
OscarCP said:
Maryland.
Worst drivers on the planet lol
 
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  • #79
TeethWhitener said:
Worst drivers on the planet lol
You haven't driven in Florida.
 
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  • #80
...or New York City, Detroit, South Bend, West Lafayette, Myrtle Beach, or...

(Besides! I'm not even there yet. :) )

-Dan
 
  • #81
TeethWhitener said:
Worst drivers on the planet lol
Clearly you have never driven in Italy.
 
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  • #82
@topsquark Where in MD are you moving to? I lived on the eastern shore for some 25 years.
 
  • #83
gleem said:
@topsquark Where in MD are you moving to? I lived on the eastern shore for some 25 years.
Frederick. My Mother moved in with my sister there last December. (Okay, last last December now.) I've been trying to find an apartment up there for over a year.

-Dan
 
  • #84
Can't help much with hazards in Fredrick. Seems to have a higher tornado frequency than the national average and heavy hurricane rainfall might cause some flooding in that area.
 
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  • #85
gleem said:
Can't help much with hazards in Fredrick. Seems to have a higher tornado frequency than the national average and heavy hurricane rainfall might cause some flooding in that area.
You missed the biggest natural disaster in the area:

My sister!

-Dan
 
  • #86
TeethWhitener said:
Worst drivers on the planet lol
Worst on the planet? I thought those were the ones driving in Mexico City:
Going the wrong way in heavy traffic, taking to the sidewalks when convenient ...
But if you are judging MD by the traffic around Washington DC, then know this: DC is not a part of Maryland. DC's surrounding areas in MD and VA deeply regret this fact, particularly as no one asked them first about having DC built right next to them.

Also: I have lived in MD for close to 40 years, and in all those years remember just four big storms and three destructive tornados. To see more of these natural attractions, I would suggest giving a try to Oklahoma and also Florida.
Oh! And we had one significant earthquake, with the epicenter far away in Virginia's Appalachians foothills: it knocked down some carvings from the facade of DC Cathedral and closed down the Washington Monument for a while. In MD proper it mostly made scary noises.
We are sort of proud of it.
 
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  • #87
gleem said:
You haven't driven in Florida.
I'll see your Florida and Phinds Italy and raise you a Delhi. Rush hour starts at 5am ish and finishes some time after midnight. To be fair, some parts of the city have lighting and some cars too. Some may have breaks.
 
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  • #88
Italy and Delhi are in a league of their own. What makes Florida so bad is there is no excuse for the way that they drive having plenty of room for driving safely and responsibly.
 
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  • #89
gleem said:
Italy and Delhi are in a league of their own. What makes Florida so bad is there is no excuse for the way that they drive having plenty of room for driving safely and responsibly.
I call that the "Me First" syndrome.

-Dan
 
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  • #90
kyphysics said:
Florida hurricanes...Oklahoma tornados...These are two areas I never want to live no matter the salary (okay, for $500,000 or more, sure...I'm there!).

I have to imagine it sucks having having your house flooded/blown down every three or so years. Not to mention your loved ones possibly dying in the midst of it.
It would be hard yes and most people in these regions don't have the means to move.
 
  • #91
pinball1970 said:
Some may have breaks.

Aw, come on . . . give me a brake. . :wink:

Lol. . .
.
 
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  • #92
OCR said:
Aw, come on . . . give me a brake. . :wink:

Lol. . .
.
Yep unintentional that one. Also to be honest, I did not drive in India I was driven.
Back seat, petrified.
 
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  • #94
The Tigers don't qualify as a natural disaster? Live and learn.

(The Lansing Lugnuts are a different story. Go Nuts!)
 
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  • #95
russ_watters said:
For natural disasters anyway.
Amen to that. Just ask the governor.
And do not forget the New Madrid quake of 1812. The sky is falling everywhere. Everywhere!
 

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