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Indexing a website

  1. May 29, 2007 #1

    ssb

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    Hello, let me explain what I mean by indexing a website:

    Sometimes ill click on something or manually type in a URL into the web browser and ill be brought to a "index" of everything on that site. For example at the top of the screen it will say "index of /~whatever"

    It is as if there is a folder with a bunch of files in it and I can see all those files, from .html, .exe, .mp3, .txt, .pdf.... basically anything that the webmaster has uploaded is displayed in a list that describes file name, size, date created, etc.

    How do i manually do this to a website so I can find files that someone may have forgotten to link to in an .html document (or link incorrectly to)?

    an example of an index that I found is
    http://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/ [Broken]

    I just want to be able to bring up that screen for all websites.

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2017
  2. jcsd
  3. May 30, 2007 #2

    chroot

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    In general, you cannot force this to happen. These lists are so-called virtual directories, and must be specifically enabled by the webmaster. If the webmaster chooses to not let you list virtual directories, then you can't, and there's no way to override it.

    - Warren
     
  4. May 30, 2007 #3

    -Job-

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    It would be a security risk if you were able to browse the structure and possibly the server-side code of a site, and it might grant users access to content the webmasters did not intend them to have, so naturally it's not something any site should have enabled, and most don't.
     
  5. Jun 8, 2007 #4
    You can use google to see if there are any accessible directories.

    Type this into google:

    indexof: www.physicsforums.com

    And if you're lucky you'd get a listing:

    https://www.physicsforums.com/Nexus/misc/ [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2017
  6. Jun 8, 2007 #5

    russ_watters

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    Browsers, by default, are supposed to pull up the "index.html" file, not the actual directory structure.
     
  7. Jun 8, 2007 #6

    russ_watters

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    Hmm, how 'bout that! :surprised

    Warren...?
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2017
  8. Jun 8, 2007 #7

    chroot

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    Oh no! They're going to steal all our.... gifs! :rofl:

    - Warren
     
  9. Jun 8, 2007 #8
    hmm.. I see you've supplied an ftp link.

    Try browsing the site with an ftp client, or just go to ftp://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/[/URL]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017
  10. Jun 8, 2007 #9

    chroot

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    No, he supplied an http url to a machine called ftp.

    - Warren
     
  11. Jun 9, 2007 #10
    pretty sure that's an option most web servers disables by default, unless your web server supports virtual hosting and you can write your own configuration for your custom domain. But like the other posters have stated, this is a major security risk and I rather have it disabled than to have some short-term conveniences ..
     
  12. Jun 10, 2007 #11

    DaveC426913

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    Well, it actually is an ftp site - he's just reached it via http.

    You can go directly to the ftp site:
    "ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/"[/URL]
    and download stuff.

    But that;s because they [I]want [/I]you to.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017
  13. Jun 10, 2007 #12

    chroot

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    The fact that it's accessed over http means it's a web site. There is no deeper definition. The facts that the same data is also offered via ftp, and that the computer's name is ftp, are irrelevant. He's using a web browser to communicate with a web server. He's getting a virtual directory from this web server, in HTML. This is distinct from using your web browser's built-in ftp client to access an actual ftp site, as your link would do.

    - Warren
     
  14. Jun 11, 2007 #13

    Indeed. The link would look like this if it were an ftp server:

    ftp://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/[/URL]

    not like this:

    [PLAIN]http://ftp.mozilla.org/pub/mozilla.org/ [Broken]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: May 2, 2017
  15. Jun 12, 2007 #14
    Well, yes, if you'd like to get technical. I was just keeping things simple, since 999 out of 1000 times, any http link to an ftp.website.com[/URL] URL will have an FTP service on it as well, seeing as how the http server is usually set up for compatibility with older browsers and downloaders that don't have FTP support.. ;)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 22, 2017
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