Inductors and 'path of least resistance'

Pythagorean

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Why is the wire in an inductor not insulated from the other turns in the wire? Or rather, why isn't it necessary?

We learn that the electricity will take the path of least resistance, so why would it bother going around each turn when it can just skim straight across the inductor and leave the opposite terminal?
 

Defennder

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Why is the wire in an inductor not insulated from the other turns in the wire? Or rather, why isn't it necessary?
Are you certain about that? Otherwise the the inductor would be simply a cylindrical shell rather than a solenoid as commonly portrayed.
 

Pythagorean

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Are you certain about that? Otherwise the the inductor would be simply a cylindrical shell rather than a solenoid as commonly portrayed.
If they are insulated, the insulation is copper colored and feels metallic.

Here in one of the pictures:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inductor

I can see on one of the inductors that it is, in fact, a coating.
 

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