Inspiring entrepreneur looking for expert advice

  • Thread starter BOEbeauty
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Summary:

Looking to talk with a Chemist and Cosmetic Chemists that are able to discuss with me the chemical compounds/formula of the hydro dipping process and the idea of using this concept in the beauty/cosmetic industry e.g replacing chemical formulas.
Hi, my name is Brooke and I am looking at developing a product that involves the concepts of Hydro dipping. I would love to know the chemical process of Hydro dipping in particular the 'sticking agent' that allows the transfer of the pattern or color from the water onto the object. Additionally, the specific chemical formula that makes up this process. My idea is to bring the concept of hydro dipping into the cosmetic industry. I am aware that Hydro dipping chemicals are harmful to the skin so I am looking to replace these chemical compounds with something similar that are not harmful to the skin.

Any Chemists and Cosmetic chemists that would be able to assist me would be greatly appreciated. The purpose of this post is for research. As I am not an expert in this field I am unsure as to whether this would actually work. So any comments would be very helpful.

Thanks :)
 

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  • #2
TeethWhitener
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Neat idea. Start here:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_transfer_printing
I'm not convinced this process would be particularly harmful. As a comparison, consider temporary tattoos, where the transfer from the paper to the skin operates in roughly the same manner. A temporary tattoo has a paper backing and a water-soluble (usually something like gelatin or PVA) layer, on top of which a design is printed. When the paper is wetted, the soluble layer dissolves and the design is transferred to skin. Hydrodipping basically works the same way, except there's no paper backing. The soluble layer is floated directly in water and dissolves, giving a film on the surface.

The most difficult part I envision for your application would probably be correctly positioning the cosmetics: things tend to move around rather uncontrollably when they're floating on a water surface. Maybe also look at Langmuir-Blodgett troughs:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Langmuir–Blodgett_trough
 
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  • #3
berkeman
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Welcome to the PF. :smile:
Any Chemists and Cosmetic chemists that would be able to assist me would be greatly appreciated.
Sorry, that is not an appropriate solicitation for the PF. Perhaps check out your local university or Craigslist to try to find some help with your idea/project. This thread is now closed.
 
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