Integration by substitution indefinite integral 5

  • Thread starter char808
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  • #1
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Homework Statement



indefinite integral 5[tex]\pi[/tex]cos[tex]\pi[/tex]t

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



5[tex]\pi[/tex] int cos[tex]\pi[/tex]t

Substitution Method

5[tex]\pi[/tex] x sin (1/[tex]\pi[/tex]t
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
34,678
6,387


Homework Statement



indefinite integral 5[tex]\pi[/tex]cos[tex]\pi[/tex]t

Homework Equations





The Attempt at a Solution



5[tex]\pi[/tex] int cos[tex]\pi[/tex]t

Substitution Method

5[tex]\pi[/tex] x sin (1/[tex]\pi[/tex]t
Is this your integral?
[tex]\int 5 \pi cos(\pi t)dt[/tex]
Click the integral above to see how the LaTeX looks.

A reasonable substitution would be u = [itex]\pi t[/itex], so du = [itex]\pi dt[/itex].
Can you take it from there?
 
  • #3
27
0


[tex]
5 \pi sin(u)du

[/tex]

[tex]

5 \pi sin(u) x du/ \pi

[/tex]

[tex]

5sin(\pi t)

[/tex]
 
  • #4
34,678
6,387


What is the first line supposed to mean?
How did you get from the first line to the second?
How did you get from the second line to the third?
Are any of these expressions related to each other in any way?
Since this is an integration problem, one would think there should be an integral sign somewhere.
 

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