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Is aerospace Engineering right for me?

  1. Hi guys, I hope I am posting this in the right spot. I'm 19 years old going to community college and I have become very interested in aerospace engineering. I really want to look into getting my degree in aerospace engineering, but I'm worried I'm just not smart enough. I wanted your guys opinion on whether this is just a dream or can I learn the trade? I am just a normal student taking normal classes right now, I'm not a super smart guy, but I would love to get into this field. If this is not just a dream what classes should I look into and what general math should I get to know the most? Also what colleges would be the best for me to look at (I live in Idaho)? Thank you guys so much for the help!


    Tyler Haug
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Astronuc

    Staff: Mentor

    Aerospace Engineering is a pretty rigorous program, or it can be depending on the student. One learns about the theory or practice of flight, propulsion, aircraft and rocket/missile structures, control systems, . . . .

    University of Washington's Aeronautics & Astronautics program is perhaps the closest one to Idaho.
    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?p=1872569#post1872569

    Also browse the AIAA website - www.aiaa.org
     
  4. djeitnstine

    djeitnstine 619
    Gold Member

    I am an aerospace engineering sophomore at the moment. All I have to say is, have a tolerance for math and physics. I've met some who like them and some who don't - I love them. Thus far it has not been too bad but the difficulty is slowly rising. If you like engineering in general, sure go ahead. This is because you can simply spend the first two years in the program and decide for yourself.

    Its not a dream but not easily attainable ;)

    btw, I'm at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Florida. They have one of the best AE programs in the US. www.erau.edu ...check them out. Also, Caltech and MIT are a few excellent choices also.
     
  5. Here is a post from a few years ago that might be relevant:

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=83805

    What I said then is still appropriate: What are your interests NOW?

    What posters are on your walls? What magazines do you read? What hobbies do you have? What websites do you frequent? What can you do for hours without realizing time has gone by?

    Your present interests and hobbies indicate where your passion lies. If your passion is for the aerospace field, good. If not, perhaps you should re-think your plan.

    Another old thread that might interest you:

    https://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=67311
     
  6. Hey guys I have completed my graduation in computer engineering.I have interest to build a career into Aerospace field.Is it possible for to pursue Masters in Aerospace?
     
  7. Yes, but it will require a lot of getting up to speed. You will need to be particular strong in math. Calculus I,II,III, differential equations, PDEs, linear algebra, and statics at the very least.
     
  8. Thanks.Are there any particular universities which offer courses??Tell me the universities please
     
  9. You have a degree in computer engineering. Use google, I'm not answering that. Sheesh, man. Lazy to the max.
     
  10. I'm interesting too for aerospace engineering.
    I will give exams for U.S universities as international student,because my country does not give me that opportunity.

    I suppose MIT,Stanford University,Caltech are excellent universities to study aerospace engineering..


    Really..Can i study aerospace engineering without studing mechanical engineering??
     
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