Is France the Best Choice for Studying Mathematics, Physics, or Engineering?

  • Thread starter Mépris
  • Start date
  • Tags
    Education
In summary: Yes, I am familiar with the International Baccalaureate program and I believe that French universities would be willing to accept students with the IB diploma.
  • #1
Mépris
850
11
I am interested in pursuing undergraduate studies in Mathematics, Physics or some form of Engineering (it's probably going to be a toss between Civil or Mechanical but I am not certain and I'd rather just leave it at that until I am certain) and I have heard mostly good things about universities in French and if I would like to go live anywhere beyond my backyard, France (and India are) is the only viable options for me, considering I cannot afford anything more expensive that that. (education in France is free but I'm also adding potential living costs)

Is anyone here studying any of those subjects in France or know how the system there functions or at least, know of people studying there? What, in your opinion/as far as you know, are the best universities for these subjects there?

N.B: Langauge isn't going to be a barrier for me, at least, not one which cannot be overcome. I do have an okay-level of French.
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
INSA Lyon (Institut National des Sciences Appliquées de Lyon)One of the top French engineering universities is one of the top French engineering universities.
I think french language is a prerequisite. For further details check out http://studyadvisor.com/" .
Hope it helps.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
  • #3
I believe the university (UJF) here in Grenoble is a rather good place for Physics, close ties to the local CEA, CNRS, Neutron Source (ILL) and Synchrotron (ESRF) for the all important "stage* " required as part of the undergraduate physics course.

While I do not know if it is the norm, the university here offers an intensive 1 month French language course before the start of/at the start of each semester.


*A stagé is a work placement, typically lasting 2-3 months at a place of scientific relevance taken in the 3rd year.
 
  • #4
npupp said:
I believe the university (UJF) here in Grenoble is a rather good place for Physics, close ties to the local CEA, CNRS, Neutron Source (ILL) and Synchrotron (ESRF) for the all important "stage* " required as part of the undergraduate physics course.

While I do not know if it is the norm, the university here offers an intensive 1 month French language course before the start of/at the start of each semester.


*A stagé is a work placement, typically lasting 2-3 months at a place of scientific relevance taken in the 3rd year.

French I doubt will be a problem for me; perhaps my spoken French is a little rusty but I'm working on that. The only possible drawbacks with studying in French would probably be with regards to getting used to terminology, considering I am now learning in English at secondary/high school.

Stagé? This sounds great. I have heard of the three "université de technologie" which include two semesters' worth of work placement/experience in their 5 (I think that's how long it was) year engineering program. What do you think of them?

And do you know anything about "Les Ecoles Normales"? I tried reading about them and "Les Grandes Ecoles" and it was a tad confusing. :\

I am studying for the International Baccalaureate diploma (note: not the French Baccalauréat!) - do you know whether French unis would allow me to enroll in an undergrad course like those who have the French Bac? Or at least, would yours? (I am currently studying Mathematics, Chemistry and Physics at Higher Level, which in French, would be Niveau Supérieur)
 
  • #5


I can say that tertiary education in France is highly regarded and offers a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, and engineering fields. The universities in France have a long history of academic excellence and are known for their rigorous curriculum and quality education.

In terms of your specific interests, there are many top universities in France that offer programs in mathematics, physics, and engineering. Some of the best universities for these subjects include Ecole Polytechnique, Ecole Normale Superieure, and Universite Paris-Saclay. These universities have a strong reputation for their research programs and offer a diverse range of courses in these fields.

It is also important to note that the education system in France is structured differently from other countries, with a focus on theoretical and analytical thinking rather than practical application. This may be something to consider when choosing a university and program.

In terms of living costs, while education in France is free for both domestic and international students, there may be additional expenses such as housing, food, and transportation. It is important to research and plan accordingly to ensure that you have enough resources to cover these costs.

Overall, France is a great option for pursuing tertiary education in mathematics, physics, or engineering. I would recommend reaching out to current students or alumni from the universities you are interested in to gain more insight into the system and their experiences. Additionally, you can also visit the websites of these universities to learn more about their programs, admission requirements, and application processes. Good luck in your academic pursuits!
 

1. What is the structure of tertiary education in France?

Tertiary education in France is divided into three main levels: Licence (bachelor's degree), Master's degree, and Doctorate. Each level is typically completed in two years, with the exception of certain professional degrees which can take longer.

2. How much does tertiary education cost in France?

Tuition fees for tertiary education in France vary depending on the institution and program, but are generally much lower than in other countries. For public universities, tuition fees range from around €200-€700 per year for bachelor's and master's degrees, and up to €4000 per year for certain professional degrees. Private universities may have higher tuition fees.

3. Is tertiary education in France taught in English?

While some universities in France do offer programs taught in English, the majority of tertiary education is still conducted in French. It is important for international students to have a good grasp of the French language in order to fully participate in their studies.

4. Are there any scholarships or financial aid options for studying in France?

Yes, there are various scholarships and financial aid options available for international students studying in France. These include scholarships offered by the French government, as well as scholarships and funding opportunities from universities and other organizations.

5. What are the top universities in France for tertiary education?

The top universities in France for tertiary education include institutions such as Ecole Normale Supérieure, Université PSL, École Polytechnique, and Université Paris Sciences et Lettres. However, the best university for a student will depend on their field of study and individual preferences.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
2
Replies
49
Views
4K
Replies
22
Views
889
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
13
Views
372
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
16
Views
359
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
10
Views
884
Replies
7
Views
843
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
15
Views
1K
Replies
3
Views
648
Replies
16
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
10
Views
2K
Back
Top