Is it possible to create a lamp that shines darkness?

In summary, a lamp that projects darkness would be a cool idea, but it would pose a radiation hazard to organisms.
  • #1
Secret
5
0
Since 7, I always have a weird idea in mind
As light can be in any colors, then why not black

Later at 15, I understand that black = absence of (visible) light (photons)
but would it be cool if we have a lamp that shines darkness?

I once have discussed this idea with my physics teacher before.
Original idea: Something that acts like light (I'll call them Dark photons), that is the opposite of light, when the two collide, they aniliate each other, rendering the result area dark, so it'll look like a lamp that project darkness

but my physics teacher said this does not work as
1. The antiparticle of photon is itself
2. It violates the conservation of energy

Instead he modified my idea a bit and propose a new proposal
New idea: Instead of acting like EM waves, why not have a stream of particles (or even quasiparticles) that radiated from a source in all directions which converts all visible photons that collided with them into IR (simply like a frequency modifier), as IR is invisible to humans, it can produce the same dimming effect. He also think the dark emitters, if possible can have a wide variety of applications

At that moment i thought it'll be a good idea, but after some careful thoughts, i think it (the new idea) 'll pose radiation hazard to organisms (e.g. overheating, Sunburns etc.) (including humans)

Guys what do you think of it and is it possible to produce a dark emitter that is safe, using known laws of physics?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Actually, photon nullifiers have been around for a while. I have a couple in my back yard with a hammock strung up between them.
 
  • #3
Secret said:
Guys what do you think of it and is it possible to produce a dark emitter that is safe, using known laws of physics?

Yes turn off the lights.
 
  • #4
build a small version of the LHC and put it on a lamp post. when you flick the switch all the mini black holes it creates will suck in nearby light (just don't walk too close)
 
  • #5
Well, what would happen if you used noise canceling principles and superposition on electromagnetic waves in the frequency of visible light?
 
  • #6
Pythagorean said:
Well, what would happen if you used noise canceling principles and superposition on electromagnetic waves in the frequency of visible light?

I think noise canceling only works because electrical signals can propagate much faster than sound waves. You couldn't cancel light, because you couldn't anticipate it in time to do anything about it.
 
  • #7
Are there any "dark spots" in the double slit interference pattern?
 
  • #8
Photon can be converted to axion, according to some theories.
 
  • #9
We don't discuss scifi as a possibility.

Secret, you are aware of this from your feedback thread.
 

Related to Is it possible to create a lamp that shines darkness?

1. What are dark emitters?

Dark emitters are hypothetical objects or sources that emit dark matter particles instead of light or other forms of electromagnetic radiation. These particles are thought to make up a significant portion of the universe's mass, but they do not interact with light and are therefore invisible to traditional telescopes.

2. How do dark emitters work?

The exact mechanism of how dark emitters emit dark matter particles is still unknown. Some theories suggest that they may be created through the decay of other particles, while others propose that they are formed through interactions between dark matter particles.

3. Are dark emitters real?

Dark emitters are still a theoretical concept and have not been directly observed or confirmed by scientific experiments. However, the existence of dark matter has been inferred through various observational evidence, and the idea of dark emitters is a potential explanation for this mysterious substance.

4. Can we detect dark emitters?

As dark matter particles do not interact with light, traditional telescopes cannot detect dark emitters. However, some scientists are working on developing new technologies and experiments that may be able to indirectly detect the presence of dark emitters through their interactions with other particles.

5. What is the significance of dark emitters?

If dark emitters are proven to exist, it could provide a better understanding of the nature and properties of dark matter. It could also have significant implications for our understanding of the universe's structure and evolution, as well as potential applications in fields such as astrophysics and particle physics.

Similar threads

  • Cosmology
Replies
13
Views
2K
  • Other Physics Topics
Replies
16
Views
4K
Replies
62
Views
3K
  • Thermodynamics
Replies
8
Views
2K
Replies
152
Views
5K
Replies
20
Views
2K
  • Beyond the Standard Models
Replies
11
Views
3K
  • Special and General Relativity
Replies
15
Views
2K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
3
Replies
82
Views
10K
  • Astronomy and Astrophysics
Replies
13
Views
2K
Back
Top