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Is it possible to totally block NFKappaB in humans?

  1. Jan 11, 2008 #1
    Is it possible to totally block NFKappaB in humans? (Even though doing that would cause a lot of problems is it even possible?) because it's not found everywhere in mice like it is in humans right?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 14, 2008 #2
    I mean could you inhibit/decrease it in one organ in a human using IkappaB or anything else? I mean blocking it in the whole body would kill a person obviously. Is it possible to block nfkappab in any organ in a human though?

    Can you temporarily inhibit nfkappab in any organ in a human using ifkappab?
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2008
  4. Jan 15, 2008 #3
    I mean like, inside a mouse what inhibits NFKappaB other than IKappaB and can IkappaB inhibit NFKappaB anywhere inside a mouse?
     
  5. Jan 15, 2008 #4

    NoTime

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    Apparently, I kappa B has various forms with different modes of action.
    So it is at least possible to target certain activities.
    This has some info http://lib.bioinfo.pl/meid:12088

    In general, organ specific inhibition of receptor response is possible, but exceedingly difficult to implement.
     
  6. Jan 15, 2008 #5
    Would organ-specific inhibition of receptor response be dangerous in a human, if so why? Also would it be possible to implement but only after tries in numerous humans?

    In this case what would exceedingly difficult to implement mean? What obstacles would cause that?
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2008
  7. Jan 16, 2008 #6

    NoTime

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    There is a lot of research going on in the area of organ-specific inhibition of receptor response, not just for NFKappaB.
    This has potential for correction of medical conditions.
    Implementation involves modifying the protein structure to change its affinity to receptors or blocking receptors.
    This would normally be done in vitro and not tested in humans until there is a high confidence in the action.

    The big obstacle is that you need to interact with one of many very similar receptors and may not be doable at all due to the similarity.
     
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