Is the Higgs really not as heavy as we thought?

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In summary, Raffaele Tito D’Agnolo and Daniele Teresi present a new framework to address the electroweak-hierarchy problem and the strong CP problem without relying on traditional solutions. They predict a distinct pattern of signals in various experiments. The concept of "naturalness" is debated, with some arguing that it is a meaningless concept and others claiming that the standard model passes the naturalness test.
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TL;DR Summary
Some new considerations of multiverse scenarios during BB.
I am not quite sure whether this is scientifically as interesting as it reads, but I think it is worth a closer look.Raffaele Tito D’Agnolo and Daniele Teresi

Abstract: We present a novel framework to solve simultaneously the electroweak-hierarchy problem and the strong CP problem. A small but finite Higgs vacuum expectation value and a small θ angle are selected after the QCD phase transition, without relying on the Peccei-Quinn mechanism or other traditional solutions. We predict a distinctive pattern of correlated signals at hadronic EDM, fuzzy dark matter, and axion experiments.

Sliding Naturalness: New Solution to the Strong-CP and Electroweak-Hierarchy Problems

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Why Higgs isn't lighter?

Isn't it on a diet? :->
 
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I'm personally of the opinion that "naturalness" is a meaningless concept that doesn't deserve serious scientific consideration and doesn't lead to useful insights (including the "electroweak-hierarchy problem" and "the strong CP problem" which are variations on that theme).

Nature is the way that Nature is and what exists in natural in the non-technical sense.

The presumption that Nature should be otherwise and could possibly be "unnatural" or require more explanation is misguided.
 
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Maybe the universe appears to arise by design because that’s the way it was designed to appear.
 
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Quarker said:
Maybe the universe appears to arise by design because that’s the way it was designed to appear.
The Tautological argument... doesn't seem to be very explanatory.
Though logically legitimate.
 
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Section 4 of "Evaluation and Utility of Wilsonian Naturalness" by James D. Wells

https://arxiv.org/abs/2107.06082

argues that there isn't a problem with the mass of the Higgs.

"The summary of this section is that the SM has low fine tunings across matchings of EFTs across its mass thresholds and therefore passes its Naturalness test. There are dozens of non-trivial tests that could have come to a different conclusion. This gives confidence that our primary theory at the present (the SM) does not register as a failure in the Naturalness evaluation with which we plan to asses conjectured theories. This is in contrast to illogically charging the SM with a lethal naturalness problem and then finding new theories that do not. The SM is Natural. Or differently said, the SM does not suffer from Unnaturalness."
 
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Related to Is the Higgs really not as heavy as we thought?

1. What is the Higgs boson and why is its weight significant?

The Higgs boson is a subatomic particle that is believed to give other particles their mass through interactions with the Higgs field. Its weight, or mass, is significant because it can provide insight into the fundamental nature of the universe and the forces that govern it.

2. Why was the Higgs boson originally thought to be heavier?

The Higgs boson was originally thought to be heavier because of theoretical predictions based on the Standard Model of particle physics. These predictions suggested that the Higgs boson should have a mass between 115 and 180 GeV (gigaelectronvolts).

3. What evidence led scientists to believe that the Higgs may not be as heavy as originally thought?

After the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012, scientists at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) found that its mass was around 125 GeV, which was lower than the predicted range. This was confirmed by further experiments and data analysis, leading to the conclusion that the Higgs may not be as heavy as originally thought.

4. How does the Higgs boson's weight affect our understanding of the universe?

The Higgs boson's weight is an important piece of the puzzle in understanding the fundamental nature of the universe. Its mass, along with other physical constants, can help explain the origin of mass, the stability of matter, and the forces that govern the interactions between particles.

5. What are the implications of the Higgs boson being lighter than expected?

The Higgs boson being lighter than expected has significant implications for particle physics and our understanding of the universe. It may indicate the presence of new physics beyond the Standard Model, which could help explain other mysteries such as dark matter and the imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe.

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