Is there a resource that discusses wave collapse experiments?

In summary, the conversation discusses the desire to read about different experiments related to the collapse of wave functions and the availability of resources on this topic. The concept of "collapse" is explained as a mathematical adjustment in models based on the result of a measurement. The question of whether "collapse" is a physical process or not is open to different interpretations in the field of quantum mechanics. It is recommended to start a new thread in the interpretations subforum for a more focused discussion on this topic.
  • #1
HomesliceMMA
60
13
I would love to read about the different experiments that deal with the collapse of the wave functions and related items. Maybe summaries, I definitely don't want to get into math or anything. Just what causes it to collapse, what doesn't, can it partially collapse, can it collapse in these circumstances, can it de-collapse, etc. etc., whatever might be out there.

Is there any website that does this? Or barring this, can anyone recommend a good book? I've read a TON of popular books related to the subject matter, almost everyone goes through the long history of everything, who figured out what, but never really gets down into the nitty gritty of things - would love one that just focused on what experiments have been done and what they show.

Thanks for any suggestions!
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
HomesliceMMA said:
I would love to read about the different experiments that deal with the collapse of the wave functions and related items.
There aren't any. In QM itself, short of adopting a particular interpretation, "collapse" is not a physical process: it's a mathematical adjustment you make in your model when you know what the result of a measurement is.

Beyond that, the question of whether "collapse" is a physical process or not is an open one, and different interpretations of QM take different positions on it. Discussion of that belongs in the interpretations subforum, not this one.
 
  • #3
The general topic of the OP is best addressed in a separate thread in the interpretations subforum, and should be focused on a more specific question than just "collapse".

This thread is closed.
 
  • Like
Likes vanhees71

Related to Is there a resource that discusses wave collapse experiments?

1. What is a wave collapse experiment?

A wave collapse experiment is an experiment in quantum mechanics that involves observing the behavior of a particle or system when it is measured or observed. It is based on the theory that a particle exists in a superposition of states until it is observed, at which point it collapses into a single state.

2. How do wave collapse experiments relate to the uncertainty principle?

Wave collapse experiments are closely related to the uncertainty principle, which states that it is impossible to know both the position and momentum of a particle at the same time. In a wave collapse experiment, the act of measuring or observing a particle causes it to collapse into a single state, making it impossible to know its previous superposition of states.

3. Are there any resources that discuss wave collapse experiments in detail?

Yes, there are many resources available that discuss wave collapse experiments in detail. These include scientific journals, books, and online articles. Some popular resources include "Quantum Mechanics: The Theoretical Minimum" by Leonard Susskind and "The Feynman Lectures on Physics" by Richard Feynman.

4. What are some real-world applications of wave collapse experiments?

Wave collapse experiments have many real-world applications, particularly in the field of quantum computing. They are also used in the development of new technologies, such as quantum sensors and detectors. Additionally, wave collapse experiments have implications for understanding the behavior of matter at a fundamental level.

5. Are there any ongoing research studies on wave collapse experiments?

Yes, there are ongoing research studies on wave collapse experiments, as it is a topic that is still being explored and understood in the scientific community. Some current studies are focused on improving the accuracy and precision of these experiments, as well as exploring their potential applications in various fields.

Similar threads

Replies
23
Views
2K
Replies
16
Views
1K
Replies
18
Views
2K
  • Quantum Physics
3
Replies
71
Views
5K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
17
Views
1K
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
2
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
584
  • Beyond the Standard Models
Replies
5
Views
399
  • Quantum Physics
Replies
24
Views
2K
Back
Top