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Is there a way to attract electrons to something?

  1. Mar 30, 2013 #1
    At the moment, I'm interested in power inhibition. One of my goals is to find something that knocks out power that DOESN'T damage equipment, like an EMP. I had an idea to find a way to attract electrons to an object, such as a magnet. Does anyone know of anything?
     
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  3. Mar 30, 2013 #2

    sophiecentaur

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    Hi MeanTomatoes
    This is a bit open ended, I think. What sort of thing did you have in mind?
    You can't just inhibit electrical power from getting to a piece of equipment by just 'sucking all the electrons away and a magnet will not attract electrons. It will only deflect moving electrons.
     
  4. Mar 30, 2013 #3
    Exactly! I'm aware of magnets DEFLECTING electrons; that's why I'm asking if there's an energy or an object or anything that can attract them.
     
  5. Mar 30, 2013 #4

    sophiecentaur

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    Where are these electrons? Are they in the connecting cables?
     
  6. Mar 30, 2013 #5
    Loose electrons, electrons flowing in wires, basically anywhere that electrons can be attracted. Is there a way to attract electrons from insulated wires, or does it depend on how thick the insulation is, and how powerful this "special magnet" (or whatever we may discover) is?
     
  7. Mar 30, 2013 #6
    If this object isn't powerful enough, I could find something that increases the object's attraction strength. There could also possibly be a way to compress the distance while increasing the strength, if you know what I mean.
     
  8. Mar 30, 2013 #7

    sophiecentaur

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    I'm afraid this doesn't make any sense. You need to sit and read about the way electricity works and get familiar with the facts before trying to invent new, speculative systems to do 'Science Fiction' things.
     
  9. Mar 30, 2013 #8

    Bobbywhy

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    MeanTomatoes,
    You know that if a simple DC circuit is energised then there is some "current" flowing from the voltage source (say, the battery) through the conducting wires, through the load (say a lamp) and back to the source. Since you want to interrupt this flow, why not open the conductive path with a switch? This normally does not damage the equipment.

    As you must already know, electrons have a negative charge. Now, if you could create a large POSITIVELY charged object and place it near the conductor in the above example, do you expect that opposite charge would attract and or limit or stop the current flow?

    Bobbywhy
     
  10. Mar 30, 2013 #9

    jim hardy

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    Magnets affect current flow via something called Hall Effect. Read up on that. My opinion is it's wildly impractical for your purpose but you should decide for yourself.

    Are you trying to shut off cellphones remotely?
    Great idea but I think it's against the law.
     
  11. Mar 31, 2013 #10
    No, I am not trying to shut off cell phones remotely. :P

    Also, I would expect the electrons to be attracted to the positive magnet.

    I was also suggested a vacuum tube with two electrical coils. We'll see! c:
     
  12. Apr 1, 2013 #11
    Just drown it all in liquid nitrogen. Most electrical components will survive it, but most circuits won't work any more.
     
  13. Apr 1, 2013 #12
    A magnetic field only affects a moving electron - and then it applies a force perpendicular to both the electrons direction AND the magnetic field - so it does not attract or repel.
     
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