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Is there such a thing as non-mechanical transport

  1. Sep 9, 2016 #1
    Hello, When looking at the simplest definition of mechanical devices, is there a way to transport something non-mechanically? Physics isn't my strong suit, but it seems to me that all transport is mechanical in nature. The phrase 'mechanical transport' comes up a lot in political discussions, what does that phrase mean to those in the physics community?
     
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  3. Sep 9, 2016 #2

    BvU

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    Hi MT, :welcome:

    Lots of stuff can be transported: mass, heat, information, etc. Deep down there's mechanics but I can imagine a telephone conversation doesn't count as mechanical transport for politicians.
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
  4. Sep 9, 2016 #3
    Thanks for the quick reply. The phrase 'mechanical transport' is being used in the context of physical movement of person or things. When you hear the phrase 'mechanical transport' does it sound redundant and ignorant of physics? If someone says 'non-mechanical transport' is legal but 'mechanical transport' in a certain area is banned are they talking gibberish in the physics world?
     
  5. Sep 9, 2016 #4

    BvU

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    The word legal doesn't appear in physics, so the question is somewhat moot.
    My first impression for
    is that they allow shouting but forbid throwing stones :smile:
    But when I apply it to
    my translation is: you can walk across and carry things with you. But you can't use a vehicle, a conveyor belt or a pipeline. The wording is inadequate for any purpose, legal or technical. What about wheelchairs, shopping carts, perambulators, roller skates and what have you.
     
  6. Sep 9, 2016 #5
    That is really helpful. The way 'mechanical transport' is being applied is to bikes. The politicians are saying bikes are 'mechanical transport' but paddle boats, all terrain skis, fixed anchor pulley systems etc. are all 'non-mechanical transport'. It sounds as though there is no way they can back that up from a physics standpoint.
     
  7. Sep 9, 2016 #6

    BvU

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    I agree. Politicians aren't bound to facts or physical reality, so what can you do ?
    The non-mechanical in the examples is physically nonsense.
     
  8. Sep 9, 2016 #7

    BvU

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    We run the risk of this thread being closed as 'on territory PF doesn't want to go'. I recognize the bikes from some issue in northern scandinavia that makes me shudder.
     
  9. Sep 9, 2016 #8
    Understandably so, I hesitate to use the word bikes as many people have tangent opinions that they like to share. If the thread is closed, private message me additional insights anyone who is interested in sharing.
     
  10. Sep 9, 2016 #9

    Nidum

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    ' Mechanical transport ' is a term sometimes used to describe transport by vehicles powered by an engine .

    ' Mechanised transport ' is used in a similar way .
     
    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
  11. Sep 11, 2016 #10

    rbelli1

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    My first thought was a horse.

    BoB
     
  12. Sep 12, 2016 #11
    Our neurons pass their signals around "non-mechanically". These signals are physically chemical ions.
     
  13. Sep 28, 2016 #12
    ok first i'm going to say i'm sorry for replying to the post with the first thing that went thru my head but to me it was kind of amusing. get on the edge of a tall bridge and steep off the side. I promise that you will be transported to the ground without any mechanically help.:-p:wink::cool:
     
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