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Light through a dense material

  1. Oct 10, 2011 #1
    As light moves through a dense material, it would interact with the atoms. Would the light lose energy, on average, in the process? As a result, would we observe a red-shift as it moves through?

    If so, what is the relationship between the amount of red-shift (energy lost) to the distance of material being traversed?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 10, 2011 #2

    DrDu

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    The dominant mechanism for energy loss is usually light quanta being completely absorbed.
    A red shift results on the mean e.g. from Raman scattering.
     
  4. Oct 13, 2011 #3

    Claude Bile

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    Energy in a wave is lost because the number of photons decreases (as opposed to the energy per photon decreasing) through absorption and scattering.

    Raman scattering can red-shift photons but this effect is extremely weak.

    Claude.
     
  5. Oct 18, 2011 #4

    DrDu

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    Last edited by a moderator: May 5, 2017
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