Light traveling through two mediums

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In summary, the question is asking for the minimum thickness of a film that will allow light to transmit through without reflection. This requires considering the relation between the index of refraction, the angle of refraction, and the critical angle. The wavelength and frequency of the light will also change as it passes through the oil, but its velocity remains constant. To calculate the thickness, the formula t = (wavelength) / (4 * index of refraction) can be used.
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mkematt96
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Homework Statement


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Homework Equations


Thickness for destructive interference ( since we don't want any reflection)
t = (wavelength) / (4 * index of refraction)
v = wavelength * frequency
c/n = v

The Attempt at a Solution


I figure since the wavelength will change going through the oil we need to calculate that first. We also know that frequency of the light wave won't change but its velocity and wave length will.

So ... c / 525 nm will gives us constant frequency or f.

Also will use speed of light divided by index of refraction of oil ... c/1.72 will give us the speed of light inside that medium which we will call V(oil)

So then... V(oil) = wavelength * f.

Then I took that wave length and divided it by 4* index of refraction of the fil.

Is my reasoning and set u close or am I missing something conceptually?

Thanks,
 
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  • #2
The question wording is a little confusing, but it seems to be asking what the minimum thickness of the film can be that will allow the light to transmit through to the substrate so that it's not reflected, in which case you need to account for the relation between the n-values, the angle of refraction they cause, and the critical angle.
 

Related to Light traveling through two mediums

1. How does light travel through two mediums?

Light travels through two mediums by undergoing a process called refraction. When light moves from one medium to another, it changes speed and direction due to the change in the density of the mediums. This change in direction is what causes the light to bend.

2. What are the two mediums involved in light refraction?

The two mediums involved in light refraction are usually air and another substance, such as water, glass, or plastic. Air is considered to have a lower density compared to these other substances, which is why light bends when it enters them.

3. How does the angle of incidence affect light traveling through two mediums?

The angle of incidence, which is the angle at which light hits the boundary between the two mediums, determines the amount of bending that occurs. The greater the angle of incidence, the greater the bending of light will be. This is known as Snell's Law.

4. Can light travel through two mediums at the same speed?

No, light will travel at different speeds in different mediums. The speed of light in a vacuum is constant, but when it enters a medium, it slows down. The speed of light in a medium is determined by its refractive index, which is the ratio of the speed of light in a vacuum to the speed of light in the medium.

5. How does the refractive index of a medium affect light traveling through it?

The refractive index of a medium determines the amount of bending that light will experience when passing through it. A higher refractive index means that light will slow down more and bend more, while a lower refractive index means that light will not slow down as much and bend less. This is why light appears to bend less when passing through air compared to water or glass.

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