Stargazing Lunar Eclipse Jan 20-21, 2019

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Is there any more information about the impactor? I don't even know how to guess at a range for size, but I imagine in order to be seen from Earth, it must have been larger than just a small boulder. Did any lunar seismic sensors detect the impact, I assume if not, that should be able to place a hard upper limit on it's mass.
 

Tom.G

Science Advisor
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...I don't even know how to guess at a range for size, but I imagine in order to be seen from Earth, it must have been larger than just a small boulder.
this from: https://gizmodo.com/holy-crap-the-moon-was-struck-by-a-meteorite-during-th-1831950105
...a preliminary guess is that the object, likely a tiny asteroid, had a mass around 22 pounds (10 kilograms).
If it was an Iron rich object, that would put it around the size of the fist of an adult man.

You might also like another thread here on the meteor strike.
https://www.physicsforums.com/threads/why-didnt-the-moon-go-fully-red-for-this-eclipse.964616/

Cheers,
Tom
 

russ_watters

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this from: https://gizmodo.com/holy-crap-the-moon-was-struck-by-a-meteorite-during-th-1831950105
...a preliminary guess is that the object, likely a tiny asteroid, had a mass around 22 pounds (10 kilograms).
If it was an Iron rich object, that would put it around the size of the fist of an adult man.
Wow, that's a lot smaller than I would have guessed. Plugging 50km/s into an impact calculator yields 3 tons of tnt equivalent.

An image of the moon 500 pixels across is 7km/pixel resolution, so to cover more than one pixel (without blooming), the fireball would need to be 7km across. I would have guessed it was. However, I did notice it was short lived, so that implies small too.
 

sophiecentaur

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Earth must look like a big red ring.
Yep. At least twice the thickness of atmosphere for the light to pass through than for one of our best sunsets. And it would be against a totally black background too. I don't really approve too much of space tourism but I'd make an exception for that. Once you are up there in a ship, you wouldn't need to go to the Moon. The Earth's shadow is out there 24/7. All you have to do is chase it.
It makes me wonder about existing pictures from past unmanned missions??? Surely you'd get the effect from a GSO at times.
 
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