Mag 6.7 earthquake near Tomakomai, Hokkaido, Japan

In summary, there have been a few large earthquakes recently, and the average number of large earthquakes has been low in the past.
  • #1

Astronuc

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USGS reports M 6.6 - 27km E of Tomakomai, Japan
2018-09-05 18:07:58 UTC 42.671°N, 141.933°E 33.4 km depth
https://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us2000h8ty#executivePowerful M6.7 earthquake rocks Hokkaido, causing massive landslides; nine dead and 31 reported missing
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2...okkaido-no-tsunami-alert-issued/#.W5E6kjrn-Ul

I found this article while reading about the current earthquake.
Hokkaido and Pacific coast [of Japan] now understood to face higher risk of powerful earthquakes
https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2...igher-risk-powerful-earthquakes/#.W5E6OTrn-Uk

Need to track down the study. Not sure if this is the source.
https://phys.org/news/2018-04-future-earthquake-tsunami-southeast-japan.html
 
Earth sciences news on Phys.org
  • #2
Right after a direct hit by one of the biggest typhoons to ever hit Japan and brutal heat this summer. They aren't catching any breaks this year.
 
  • #3
I saw the news about Japan earlier, and just now checking stuff.co.nz, I see there was an Mag 7.8 earthquake off Fiji - https://www.stuff.co.nz/world/south-pacific/106895640/magnitude-78-quake-hits-off-fiji

I think @davenn mentioned in another thread that the average number of large earthquakes was quite low at some point (if I recall correctly) - is that being made up by now, with all these quakes happening?
 
  • #4
StevieTNZ said:
...
I think @davenn mentioned in another thread that the average number of large earthquakes was quite low at some point (if I recall correctly) -
Indeed! Just pulled up the USGS data for 6.5+ earthquakes over the last 10 years, and between April 3rd and August 4th of this year, there was only one earthquake of that magnitude.
That was 123 days.
With quakes occurring on April 2nd and August 5th, that's about a 62 day period average between the 3 quakes.
The average time between such sized quakes was about 7.4 days.

is that being made up by now, with all these quakes happening?
Analyzing earthquake data makes me crazy, so I won't comment.

Here's my obligatory graph, just in case you'd like to scratch YOUR head. :biggrin:

2018.09.06.earthquakes.obligatory.graph.png
 

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1. What caused the Mag 6.7 earthquake near Tomakomai, Hokkaido, Japan?

The earthquake near Tomakomai, Hokkaido, Japan was caused by the movement of tectonic plates. The region is located near the Kuril Trench, where the Pacific Plate is subducting beneath the Okhotsk Plate, causing stress and strain to build up and eventually release as an earthquake.

2. How strong was the earthquake and what does the magnitude measurement mean?

The earthquake was a magnitude 6.7, which means it was a strong earthquake that could cause damage to buildings and infrastructure. The magnitude measurement is a logarithmic scale that measures the amount of energy released by an earthquake. For every increase in 1 on the scale, the earthquake is 10 times stronger.

3. Was there any damage or casualties from the earthquake?

There were reports of some damage and several injuries, but luckily no fatalities have been reported so far. The extent of the damage is still being assessed, but it is believed to be relatively minor due to Japan's strict building codes and earthquake preparedness.

4. How often do earthquakes of this magnitude occur in this region?

Earthquakes of this magnitude are not uncommon in Japan, as the country is located in a seismically active region. On average, there are about 1-2 earthquakes of magnitude 6.0 or higher in Japan every year.

5. Is there a risk of aftershocks following this earthquake?

Yes, there is always a risk of aftershocks following a major earthquake. These are smaller earthquakes that occur in the same region as the initial earthquake and can continue for weeks or even months after the main event. It is important for residents to stay prepared and follow any safety measures advised by local authorities.

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