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Mass, energy, gravity, space, time and math

  1. Jul 29, 2012 #1
    Can we perceive these things directly? I'd say we can't. We can only perceive them indirectly. We have no senses to directly perceive these things.
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jul 30, 2012 #2

    ZapperZ

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    Provide an example of something that you consider to be perceived "directly".

    Zz.
     
  4. Jul 30, 2012 #3

    arildno

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    Dremmer:
    We have no senses that perceive anything "directly", so frankly, I don't see your point.
     
  5. Jul 30, 2012 #4
    We do not even know in full detail what goes on when we "perceive".
     
  6. Jul 30, 2012 #5
    Color. We can directly perceive an object's color, but not its mass.
     
  7. Jul 30, 2012 #6

    ZapperZ

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    How is this "direct"?

    "Color" is some frequency in the electromagnetic spectrum. So one actually detects the frequency via some means, either using a resonant circuit/system, or in the case of visible light, via your eyes, which convert it to electrical impulses in your optical system.

    So why is this more direct than detecting mass of an object?

    Zz.
     
  8. Jul 30, 2012 #7

    arildno

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    dremmer:
    Somewhat more interesting questions would have been, for example:
    1. Have we reason to believe that phenomena not appreciable by our sensory apparatus can as reliably be measured as those phenomene we may also perveive with our sensory apparatus?

    2. Why have we not developed a sensory apparatus that measures the mass of objects, or differences in the various local gravity fields?
     
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