Masters in Engineering with BA in math

In summary, if you have a degree in mathematics, you should be able to get a masters in engineering with a few years of hard work. You should take classes in physics and chemistry, and also take engineering courses. It may be helpful to have a B.S. in engineering, but it's not necessary. You should also be able to study hard and have good time management skills.
  • #1
Badjuju270
6
0
Whats up guys.
I have a BA in mathematics and want to get a master's in Civil or Nuclear Engineering. I have not taken any Calc. based physics nor chemistry; I have also not taken any engineering courses.

Question: How long will it take me to get a Master's in engineering. Any suggestions and personal accounts from those who have made similar jumps would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

If you read this thread, you must respond. Nonnegotiable. Final. End of discussion. : )
 
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  • #2
I would off the top of my head say three years...at least. Unfortunately much of engineering is built off the previous class, so it does not lend itself well to simply taking a bunch of credit hours. You should have no problem with the chemistry or physics, but it very well may take a while to get the degree.

Do you plan on doing class only or thesis option? If you can get funded and do a thesis option, it may (or may not) reduce time required.
 
  • #3
For a MS in civil, I would say 3-4 years. For a MS in nuclear, probably around 4-5.
 
  • #4
It took me 12 months to get a masters in nuclear engineering, starting with a BA in physics. Recognizing that physics is 'closer' to an engineering backround than mathematics, I would think it would take you longer than it took me. The math involved is not really very sophisticated, so I'm not sure a math degree helps too much. Maybe 'sophisticated' is the wrong word here. I'm thinking there is not a lot of galois theory or such.

You said "either civil or nuclear." If you're in a hurry, pick the one you like better. They are really quite different.

Sorry if this doesn't help much, but I was compelled to reply ;)
 
  • #5
Badjuju270 said:
Whats up guys.
I have a BA in mathematics and want to get a master's in Civil or Nuclear Engineering. I have not taken any Calc. based physics nor chemistry; I have also not taken any engineering courses.

Question: How long will it take me to get a Master's in engineering. Any suggestions and personal accounts from those who have made similar jumps would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

If you read this thread, you must respond. Nonnegotiable. Final. End of discussion. : )

It takes people with accredited engineering degrees at least 2 years to get their masters. I would say, with the number of undergrad catch-up classes you;d have to take, you're looking at 4 years. Then again, I don't know how much you want to torture yourself by loading up your schedule. Grad classes take a lot of time out of your week. You would be hard pressed to beat 4 years.
 
  • #6
gmax137 said:
It took me 12 months to get a masters in nuclear engineering, starting with a BA in physics.
That's insane: how many courses/semester credits did you take in those 12 months?
 
  • #7
gmax137 said:
It took me 12 months to get a masters in nuclear engineering, starting with a BA in physics.

Please elaborate, how you you possibly have done that, not even having a B.S.?
 
  • #8
Awww man I just replied to a 6 month old thread.
 
  • #9
Phyisab**** said:
Awww man I just replied to a 6 month old thread.
That's not too bad. If it were a year old (or older) thread that would be a different story (people do resurrect threads that old).
 
  • #10
Phyisab**** said:
Please elaborate, how you you possibly have done that, not even having a B.S.?

The important thing is to learn how to study (so that you can continue your education throughout life). I'm not sure if there's a meaningful difference between a BA and a BS degree, as far as the curriculum goes. Classical mechanics, EM, fluids, relativity, quantum, more classical mechanics... calculus, more calculus, diff eq, linear algebra, real analysis, complex analysis, more calculus & complex analysis...

ps - I think it's OK to revive old threads. Otherwise, why keep them around?
 

What is a Masters in Engineering with a BA in math?

A Masters in Engineering with a BA in math is a graduate degree program that combines advanced coursework in engineering with a strong foundation in mathematics. It is designed for students who have a bachelor's degree in math or a related field and want to pursue a career in engineering.

What are the benefits of pursuing a Masters in Engineering with a BA in math?

There are several benefits to pursuing this degree program. Firstly, it provides a strong foundation in both engineering and math, which is highly valued by employers in various industries. Secondly, it opens up a wide range of career opportunities, including roles in research, design, development, and management. Lastly, it can lead to higher salaries and faster career growth compared to those with just a bachelor's degree.

What are the common courses in a Masters in Engineering with a BA in math program?

The specific courses may vary depending on the university and specialization, but some common courses include advanced mathematics, engineering principles, computer programming, data analysis, and specialized courses in the chosen field of engineering such as mechanical, electrical, or chemical engineering.

Is a Masters in Engineering with a BA in math a challenging program?

Yes, this program can be challenging as it combines advanced coursework in both engineering and math. Students are expected to have a strong foundation in math and be able to apply it in engineering problems. However, with dedication and hard work, it is a highly rewarding and valuable degree.

What are the career prospects after completing a Masters in Engineering with a BA in math?

Graduates of this program can pursue a variety of careers in industries such as aerospace, automotive, construction, energy, manufacturing, and technology. Some job titles may include engineer, researcher, data analyst, project manager, or consultant. With the increasing demand for professionals with strong skills in both engineering and math, this degree can lead to a successful and fulfilling career.

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