Mathamatical Description of the Cosmological Principle

In summary, the conversation discusses the concept of a 'center of the universe' and how the acceleration between two bodies is independent of its position. The principles of isotropy and homogeneity are also mentioned, with the suggestion of using a Robertson-Walker-Lemaitre line element to model the distance measure in the cosmos.
  • #1
33
0
I think this belongs here, while not relativistic, is is about objects moving relative to one another.

Summery:
This stems from the description of 'Dark Energy' in a mathamatical context to show that you can place a 'center of the universe' at any point in space, and the accelaration vector between two bodies is inderpendant of the position vectors to this 'arbitary center of the universe'.

Body:
The presumption is that there exsits a 'center of the universe', and that from it we can draw a diagram


A
...\
...\___________________
...B......C

Where A is our 'center of the universe', B is one body, C is the other body. There is a radial distances rB and rC respectfully, and the magnitude of radial accelaration from this 'center of the universe' is proportional to these distances.

From B, an oberserver notes that C is accelerating away from him at some accelaration a'C and reversely, from C an observer notes that B is accelerating away from him at some accelaration a'B

How do I show that no matter where I place A, the magnitude of accelaration is not dependant on the 'center of the universe'?

I thought you could describe a'C and a'B as;

a'C = rCK*cos( 1/2 n ) - rBK
a'B = rBK*cos( 1/2 n ) - rCK

Where K is the constant of proportionality and n is the angle between the bodies. Using the geometry between them. I guess that the cosine formula is now somehow incorperated into this;

a2=b2+c2-2bc*CosA

Because there are simmilarities in both equations, but I'm not sure where to go from here in the proof...

Haths
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
You can model the principles of isotropy and homogeneity by setting up a line element that defines the distance measure in the cosmos by all observers. By ansatz we say that every observer will be able to construct a spherically symmetric coordinate system around themselves. Spherically symmetric implies no preferred direction (isotropy) and all observers can do this ( homogeneity).

The line element is one of the Robertson-Walker-Lemaitre varieties and the simplest form looks like this

[tex]ds^2 = c^2dt^2-a(t)^2d\sigma^2[/tex]

see Wiki on 'Robertson-Walker metric'.
 
  • #3
ara,

The Cosmological Principle is a fundamental concept in cosmology that states that the universe is homogeneous and isotropic on a large scale. This means that on average, the distribution of matter and energy is the same in all directions and at all points in the universe. This principle is often used in the study of dark energy, as you mentioned, to show that the acceleration of objects is independent of an arbitrary center of the universe.

To mathematically describe this principle, we can use the concept of radial acceleration, as you have mentioned. Let us consider two bodies, B and C, with radial distances rB and rC from an arbitrary center A. The magnitude of radial acceleration from A can be represented as a function of these distances, denoted as aB and aC, respectively.

Now, let us consider an observer at B who measures the acceleration of C as a'C. Similarly, an observer at C measures the acceleration of B as a'B. As you have correctly pointed out, we can represent these accelerations as:

a'C = rCK*cos( 1/2 n ) - rBK
a'B = rBK*cos( 1/2 n ) - rCK

where K is the constant of proportionality and n is the angle between the bodies. However, we can also use the cosine formula to rewrite these equations as:

a'C = √(rCK^2 + rBK^2 - 2rCKrBK*cos(n))
a'B = √(rCK^2 + rBK^2 - 2rCKrBK*cos(n))

Notice that both equations have the same form, with the only difference being the order of the terms. This means that no matter where we place the arbitrary center A, the magnitude of acceleration will remain the same, as it is solely dependent on the radial distances and the angle between the bodies.

In other words, the Cosmological Principle holds true as the acceleration of objects is independent of the position of the arbitrary center of the universe. This mathematical representation helps us understand that the universe is uniform on a large scale, and there is no preferred reference point or center.

I hope this helps in understanding the mathematical description of the Cosmological Principle. Keep exploring and questioning!
 

1. What is the cosmological principle?

The cosmological principle is a fundamental concept in cosmology that states that the universe is homogeneous (uniform) and isotropic (the same in all directions) on a large scale. This means that at any given point in the universe, the properties and structures are the same in all directions.

2. How is the cosmological principle mathematically described?

The cosmological principle is mathematically described using the Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) metric, which is a solution to Einstein's field equations in general relativity. This metric describes the spatial geometry of the universe and allows us to calculate the expansion of the universe over time.

3. Why is the cosmological principle important in cosmology?

The cosmological principle is important because it forms the basis for our understanding of the large-scale structure and evolution of the universe. It allows us to make predictions and test theories about the origin and evolution of the universe.

4. Are there any exceptions to the cosmological principle?

While the cosmological principle holds true on a large scale, there are some exceptions on smaller scales. For example, on a smaller scale, the universe is not completely homogeneous and isotropic due to the presence of galaxies, clusters of galaxies, and other structures. However, on a large enough scale, the cosmological principle remains valid.

5. Can the cosmological principle be proven?

The cosmological principle is a fundamental assumption in cosmology and cannot be proven in a mathematical sense. However, it is supported by observations and is consistent with our current understanding of the universe. As our understanding of the universe evolves, the cosmological principle may be refined or modified, but for now, it remains a key principle in cosmology.

Suggested for: Mathamatical Description of the Cosmological Principle

Replies
7
Views
344
Replies
4
Views
901
Replies
3
Views
1K
Replies
46
Views
2K
Replies
13
Views
895
Back
Top