MBTI type (Myers-Briggs Type Indicator) -- Jung Typology Personality Test

  • Thread starter Apple_Mango
  • Start date

MBTI

  • INTP

    Votes: 6 33.3%
  • INTJ

    Votes: 8 44.4%
  • ENTP

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • ENTJ

    Votes: 1 5.6%
  • ISTP

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • ESTP

    Votes: 1 5.6%
  • ISFP

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • ISTP

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • ISFJ

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • ESFJ

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • ISTJ

    Votes: 2 11.1%
  • ESTJ

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    18
  • #1
Apple_Mango

Main Question or Discussion Point

I always keep on taking the MBTI and I get INTP. What is everyone else's MBTI?
http://www.humanmetrics.com/cgi-win/jtypes2.asp

<< Mentor Note -- INTP = Introverted iNtuitive Thinking Perceiving >>
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
Apple_Mango
Myers-Brigg is a personality type test. It was created several decades ago by a man name Carl's Jung. It's used by cooperates today to type people. Each type has their own description. Take it to find out yours.
 
  • #3
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No, it was made by two housewives Meyers and Briggs based on the work of Carl Jung.
 
  • #4
Apple_Mango
No, it was made by two housewives Meyers and Briggs based on the work of Carl Jung.
k my mistake
 
  • #5
gleem
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What does it mean if I am not on the list?
 
  • #6
Evo
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What does it mean if I am not on the list?
It means you're not human. :oldbiggrin:

I think I usually test either INTP or INTJ, depending on my mood. It is a test that is affected by your mood.
 
  • #7
gleem
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I"m INFJ so it is a valid classification although It may not be common for those who frequent this site. It seems fairly accurate in that I started out in experimental nuclear physics and ended up in medical physics. The classification would favor me being in the health care field.:biggrin:
 
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  • #9
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INTJ first time I've taken this type of test...
 
  • #10
DaveC426913
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But only 1/45 of the possible test results are allowed! Just 16 of the 720 possible combinations.
What do you mean? There are 4 factors, each with two options, leading to 16 possible combinations.

And I was forced into INTJ when the results were ITNJ
There's no such thing as ITNJ.
The order is always I/E N/S T/F J/P.

Is that how you came up with 720?
 
  • #11
Evo
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  • #12
Apple_Mango
Sorry, I forgot to add the NF group.

I always get INTP. I got INTJ a few times but that was only 3 out of 50.

Albert Einstein and Charles Darwin are INTP. I guess I am famous.
 
  • #13
Tom.G
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There's no such thing as ITNJ.
The order is always I/E N/S T/F J/P.

Is that how you came up with 720?
I was initially going by the ordering of the four factors based on the numerics of the four fields, and came up with 48 possible orderings (probably wrong since I can't replicate it now.) Then, without a detailed reading of the testing details, discovered two more characters and jumped to the conclusion of 6! = 720 combinations, again obviously wrong. o:)

I see @Evo has just posted, maybe she will be kind enough to delete my post of an hour ago, please?
 
  • #14
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Albert Einstein and Charles Darwin are INTP. I guess I am famous.
I guess logic isn't your long suit. Albert Einstein and Charles Darwin were both male. I am male. Does that make me famous, as well?
 
  • #15
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A fun test for those who want to engage in talking about the mystery of personality & its meaning in a fuzzy, gentle sort of way; but not accepted as reliable or useful in the field of professional psychology. For starters, see Wikipedia's article on Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator; here is an excerpt from the beginning of the "Criticism" section of the article, which is a fairly lengthy section:

The validity (statistical validity and test validity) of the MBTI as a psychometric instrument has been the subject of much criticism.

It has been estimated that between a third and a half of the published material on the MBTI has been produced for the special conferences of the Center for the Application of Psychological Type (which provide the training in the MBTI, and are funded by sales of the MBTI) or as papers in the Journal of Psychological Type(which is edited and supported by Myers–Briggs advocates and by sales of the indicator).[41] It has been argued that this reflects a lack of critical scrutiny.[41] Many of the studies that endorse MBTI are methodologically weak or unscientific.[9] A 1996 review by Gardner and Martinko concluded: "It is clear that efforts to detect simplistic linkages between type preferences and managerial effectiveness have been disappointing. Indeed, given the mixed quality of research and the inconsistent findings, no definitive conclusion regarding these relationships can be drawn."[9][42]

Psychometric specialist Robert Hogan wrote: "Most personality psychologists regard the MBTI as little more than an elaborate Chinese fortune cookie ..."[43]

If anyone (e.g. the OP) wants to defend this treasured chestnut, I ask that you read not just the above, but the entire section on criticisms (it goes on for quite a while) to get a feel for the depth of the problems; and also that that you rely not only on your personal experience but also on at least a bare minimum level of source (I'd consider Wikipedia close to the minimum) with cites for studies or other academic/scientific publications, as recommended by PF in the forum Global Guidelines. Yeah, this is the General Discussion forum, but this is supposedly a "psychological" test, so let's take a shot at being conscientious here.

Speaking of personal experience, here is mine: I think that last quote from Robert Hogan, above, gets it right: the test is fun for reasons similar to why fortune cookies are fun; harmless if you take the results lightly. I took it years ago, and yeah, briefly it was fun, even compelling: many of us at a certain age (I was in my 20s then) yearn for a glimpse into the mystery of our personality; we also yearn for validation, which the test provides as well since each of the various flavors (letter combinations) is described in positive terms.
 
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  • #16
DaveC426913
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Speaking of personal experience, here is mine: I think that last quote from Robert Hogan, above, gets it right: the test is fun for reasons similar to why fortune cookies are fun; harmless if you take the results lightly.
Indeed. Human personalities are a continuum. If I put 7 billion dots on a large piece of paper, they are not going to gather neatly into pods with well-defined gaps between them.

If I then devise one after another ways to divide them up, that is not going to change one wit the location of the dots on the page.
In fact, I will have to use a VERY find pen to draw the line between many of the dots that are all over the page.
This means some dots will actually be physically closer to dots in another section than to dots in their own section.

How much value can there be in a system that artificially separates dots that are very close together, while artificially gathering dots physically more separate?

(Applies to Astrological signs too)
 
  • #17
Apple_Mango
I guess logic isn't your long suit. Albert Einstein and Charles Darwin were both male. I am male. Does that make me famous, as well?
But my post wasn't meant to be taken literally. Most people reading my post would know that.
 
  • #18
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But my post wasn't meant to be taken literally.
If you're speaking with someone face-to-face, there are various cues such as facial expressions or body language that indicate you're pulling their leg. In an online forum, the usual practice is to include some indication that you're kidding, like a smiley of some sort - :oldbiggrin:

Most people reading my post would know that.
I doubt that this is true. We get all sorts of students here, at all different levels. Besides this, you're pretty new here, so "most people" would have no idea whether you were being serious or not.
 
  • #19
Evo
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The test at the site is just meant to be for fun, so take it for fun, not as some diagnosis or as something serious. We have had this test at this site posted for years. Have fun with it.
 
  • #20
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About 15 years ago I got involved in a large engineering project where I was working onsite at the customers plant. The project team included about 20 people, half customer employees and half from the outside. Early on we had an all-day teambuilding session that included the MBTI -- I don't recall all the details now but the scoring was revealed in stages: a line was drawn on the floor and we divided into two groups (depending on which of the two "opposite" traits we had). Then another line was drawn to make quadrants and we were subdivided. This went on and on to obtain a grid of the 16 types. Now, the entire team was engineers and project managers who had been engineers, so we all (almost) ended up in the same two squares (introverted, analytical,... ). All except for one guy, Bob, who as the process went along was moved further and further away from the rest of the group. We joked about it at the time but I'm sure the whole thing made Bob quite uncomfortable.
 
  • #21
DaveC426913
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a line was drawn on the floor and we divided into two groups (depending on which of the two "opposite" traits we had). Then another line was drawn to make quadrants and we were subdivided. This went on and on to obtain a grid of the 16 types.
The MTBI test was actually the inspiration for me to build the world's first (and hopefully last) 4 dimensional cube.

During a particularly dull job search session, I realized that the types cannot be isometrically represented without some form of distortion and/or arbitrary split up that favours one trait over the others. Like this:
mgr-adm-supv.gif

Some traits are duplicated and separated, while others are not.

So I started playing with visual rendering and realized that the data is an example of an entity with 4 independent degrees of freedom (even if that freedom is only binary). I knew I had to build such a 4-dimensional diagram.

I have a thread somewhere here on PF that documents my adventures through several versions, using chemistry tinker toy sets, wood and even soldered brass. Loyal fans will be pleased to know that, with version 4 (3D printed components), I have finally solved all the engineering problems and I am nearing the end of this 15 year journey, and will soon have my patented tesseract in-hand. I'd better go find that thread and update it...


Sorry, what was the question again?
 
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  • #22
cronxeh
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I take this test with a grain of salt, it has similar pseudo-scientific odor as the StrengthFinder, but strangely enough I'm always either INTP or INTJ whenever I take it.
 
  • #23
symbolipoint
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This discussion now a year old was quoted or referenced in a recent closed thread/topic.

What should or could we do when a job interviewer asks , "tell me about yourself?" Should we have gone to a professional psychologist who could test, assess, and then give us a personality-type description of ourselves? Maybe!

Try putting a small group of people together on a team to study and try to solve a problem. Each person is different, and the team can have an effect from everybody's effort. Each team member may be expected to have a different personality type (whatever each "type" means.)
 
  • #24
epenguin
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The sample is small. But I'd guess it is significant that nearly everyone who has answered goes into 2 out of 12 boxes.
 
  • #25
DaveC426913
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<aside>

Man I hate when this happens.

I got an alert that a response had been posted to this thread, so I came to read it.
I saw epenguin's post, so I went back through posts to see the context, and I came across post #21 above.

What a brilliant post! This guy's discovered that the MBTI is a four-dimensional table! I've been playing with that for years!
I've got to respond and tell him I have been pursuing the exact same line of logic!

Who IS this brilliant guy?? He must be a ...

Oh wait. It's me.

-sigh-
</aside>
 

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