Meeting of photons

  • #1

Main Question or Discussion Point

hello!
q: can photons bounce back from photons?
i'm thinking about a ray of light in space crossing in front of my eyes but i can't see it off course since it dosen't hit my eyes or particles like dust. so if i want to see it, can i turn on a flashlight making the ray hit by the rays of the flashlight so some of the photons will bounce back [to my eyes] after hitting the photons of the ray making it possible for me to see the ray.
thanks
 

Answers and Replies

  • #2
Hi,
The short answer is no. Quite strictly no.

If conditions are right, you would rather have particle creation. There is speculation that at insanely high photon densities, photons may interact, but this hasn't really been proven, and it's beyond conventionnal theories.
 
  • #3
PhilKravitz
No. Photons do not interact.

There can be effects in matter where there are non-linear effect but that is due to the photon interacting with the charged particles in the matter.
 
  • #4
Hi,
The short answer is no. Quite strictly no.

If conditions are right, you would rather have particle creation. There is speculation that at insanely high photon densities, photons may interact, but this hasn't really been proven, and it's beyond conventionnal theories.
what about interference?
 
  • #5
Interference is not interaction. Interference is sumation. If you put two dollars in a bank account, you have two dollars, but each of them doesn't know about the other. The same with photons.
 
  • #6
DaveC426913
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Interference is not interaction. Interference is sumation. If you put two dollars in a bank account, you have two dollars, but each of them doesn't know about the other.
But make sure you put them in both face up! Otherwise you will have zero dollars! :biggrin:
 
  • #7
Interference is not interaction. Interference is sumation. If you put two dollars in a bank account, you have two dollars, but each of them doesn't know about the other. The same with photons.
that is the quantum perception is it? but you can look at it as a wave and then the waves are changing, like the tops gets higher
 
  • #8
jtbell
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Photons can in principle interact indirectly with each other via Delbrück scattering, but the probability is expected to be extremely tiny and as far as I know has not actually been observed (yet).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delbruck_scattering
 
  • #9
Photons can in principle interact indirectly with each other via Delbrück scattering, but the probability is expected to be extremely tiny and as far as I know has not actually been observed (yet).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delbruck_scattering
what about light changes in elctromagnetic (not sure, maybe just magnetic) surrounding (dont want to say fields because they are not made of photns, but a magnet emits photons).

the wiki expample, i feel, not quite good. im asking about hitting of two photons like two soccer balls
thanks
 
  • #10
Vanadium 50
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Light-by-light scattering has been observed. But it is a very, very, very difficult measurement because the effect is so small. It is a very small quantum mechanical correction to a classical theory where there is identically zero interaction.
 
  • #11
Light-by-light scattering has been observed. But it is a very, very, very difficult measurement because the effect is so small. It is a very small quantum mechanical correction to a classical theory where there is identically zero interaction.
ok so no significant interaction, why is it? why two photons crossing each other and nothing happens?
 
  • #12
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Because photons interact only with charged particles and photons are uncharged.
 
  • #13
PhilKravitz
Light-by-light scattering has been observed. But it is a very, very, very difficult measurement because the effect is so small. It is a very small quantum mechanical correction to a classical theory where there is identically zero interaction.
What is the mechanism?
 
  • #14
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This is my first time, I tried to find the thread which best fits my question, so please excuse me if I have made a mistake:

As far as I know e-m waves 'can superimpose' can two waves meet to form enough energy to produce particle and anti-particle pair. Thanks
 

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