1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

MPA calculation VS MPA listed on materials

  1. Aug 19, 2015 #1
    Hi,

    I am not a mathematician or scientist or student. In advance I ask that you please excuse my ignorance. I calculated that at tensile strength of .51 equals an MPA of .0035163. Thank god for internet calculators. I do not know what MPA means, but materials are listed this way. So if I want to choose a material with an MPA of greater than .0035163 and I look at the MPA of materials, the MPA listed seems mammoth in comparison and defies logic. For example, glass is listed as having an MPA of 60. So what am I missing?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 19, 2015 #2

    DEvens

    User Avatar
    Education Advisor
    Gold Member

  4. Aug 19, 2015 #3
    Sorry - .51 PSI
     
  5. Aug 19, 2015 #4

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    Yeah, but did you get DEvans answer of what MPA means (to be accurate, it should be written as MPa)? You never indicated if by that information, you realize that this is a psi to MPa unit conversion.

    Zz.
     
  6. Aug 19, 2015 #5

    DEvens

    User Avatar
    Education Advisor
    Gold Member

    Oh. For 0.51 PSI you don't need much of a container. You could probably get that much pressure from a party balloon.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: MPA calculation VS MPA listed on materials
Loading...