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Need a way to collect voltage from a constant source

  1. Aug 5, 2017 #1
    Say I have a constant source of 1 volt that will not diminish in volts during use and would like to collect that energy how would I do it. I have been trying To figure this out for the past month and source really appreciate some help. Thanks
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Aug 5, 2017 #2

    phinds

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    Why not just use the voltage source? Why go through some intermediate step of wasting energy while converting it to another form or a different voltage level only to have more waste when using it from the new source?
     
  4. Aug 5, 2017 #3
    So for every collector in the source I receive 1 volt but the trick is when I interconnect the collectors I still receive that one volt. I would like to know a way to interconnect them and have the voltage add up.
     
  5. Aug 5, 2017 #4

    phinds

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    This is all very vague. Please tell us what it is that you are really trying to do.
     
  6. Aug 5, 2017 #5
    So I have a source that produces 1 volt of electricity. I have several electrode pairs put into this source. My multimeter shows that each of these pairs has one volt but I would like to interconnect this pair to say get two volts with two pairs interconnected. I could draw it out for u if it helps. Thanks
     
  7. Aug 5, 2017 #6
    Thing is when I connect these electrodes I still only get one volt
     
  8. Aug 5, 2017 #7
  9. Aug 5, 2017 #8

    jack action

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    Is this what you're looking for (series and parallel circuits):

    160104-difference-between-series-and-parallel-02.jpg
     
  10. Aug 5, 2017 #9
    Thank you I will try this tonight and let you know how it worked out
     
  11. Aug 6, 2017 #10
    I tried wiring in Series but it did not work
     
  12. Aug 6, 2017 #11

    phinds

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    Since it's hard to tell what you are talking about, you need to post a circuit diagram showing exactly what you are doing. In your initial post, you talk about having "a" source. Does this mean you really only have a single source?
     
  13. Aug 6, 2017 #12
    I have a feeling I may need to attach capacitors to my electrodes because the electricity is just going straight back into the source but if I use capacitors it will act like a battery and then I should be able to connect the in series. Any thoughts on this
     
  14. Aug 6, 2017 #13
    Yes it's a single source
     
  15. Aug 6, 2017 #14
    I'll make a circuit diagram an I will send it to u
     
  16. Aug 6, 2017 #15

    davenn

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    As has already been asked a couple of times with no clarification from you

    WHAT is your voltage source ?

    You are getting poor responses because you are giving poor information
    You need to help us with good info so that the people here can help you. Else we are all just guessing on what you are doing
     
  17. Aug 6, 2017 #16
  18. Aug 6, 2017 #17

    phinds

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    Huh? Just connect them in series as has already been said. It's trivial.
     
  19. Aug 6, 2017 #18

    russ_watters

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    So, I'm having trouble getting past the OP:
    Do you understand that voltage isn't energy (or power)? And that many energy sources have a certain power output they are capable of, which means that when you harvest the energy the voltage goes down?

    Also, it kind of looks like you are trying to multiply the energy from one source, as if you could add additional connections to a 1.5V battery to wire it in series with itself and increase the voltage. That doesn't work.

    But all of this remains vague, since you won't tell us what the source is....

    So: what is your energy source?
     
  20. Aug 7, 2017 #19

    davenn

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    pretty diagram, but it still doesn't answer my question

    one more time ......

    WHAT is your voltage source ?

    Be VERY specific ...
    is it a device ... what / make and model
     
  21. Aug 7, 2017 #20

    jack action

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    No matter what your source is:
    • if you have a single source;
    • if you have a constant 1 volt between each pair of electrodes, no matter how many pairs you have;
    Then it is because the pairs of electrodes are all connected in parallel with the source.

    The only way to convert 1 volt into 2 volts is to use a transformer between your source and your electrodes.
     
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