Neuroscience Course Assistance

In summary: It is important to select a major that will give you the opportunity to pursue research. However, it is also important to consider what you are interested in and what you would like to do with your degree. You can select a major that has research opportunities or you can select a major that will allow you to specialize in a specific area of research.
  • #1
abstrakt!
19
0
I have selected Neuroscience is the major that I will be pursuing (for personal and intellectual reasons). I work forty hours a week and take classes at night and online through my community college. I currently have a transfer contract with William and Mary, upon completion of the required courses.

The requirements for the major are here: http://www.wm.edu/offices/registrar/documents/catalog/catalogbydept/Neuroscience.pdf .

I was only able to afford one course last semester (I will be able to afford four this semester), so I took Precalculus as I am 23 and my highest maths was standard Algebra in high school.

I will be taking Calculus I this semester. I want to take University Physics I-II, Bio I-II, Chem I-II, Organic Chem I-II, Calculus II and III, Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra (in addition to subjects such as philosophy, psychology and the general requirements). However, I am not entirely sure if all of these will be absolutely necessary. Since I work full-time, it is difficult to take too many of these courses at one time, but I think I will be able to understand them as long as I have time to study. Which additional courses should I take this semester?

I am primarily interested in a career in academia as a teacher and conduct research on topics such as sensation and perception, consciousness, suicide and depression, etc.,.

What is a standard neuroscience course study consist of? I appreciate your time and assistance.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
abstrakt! said:
I will be taking Calculus I this semester. I want to take University Physics I-II, Bio I-II, Chem I-II, Organic Chem I-II, Calculus II and III, Differential Equations, Vector Calculus, and Linear Algebra (in addition to subjects such as philosophy, psychology and the general requirements).

These are all useful for neuroscience. If you study sensation and perception you need a basic knowledge of all of these, so you can forget most of it after your exams, but it's good to master them at some stage. Suicide and depression are more clinical topics.
http://www.sfn.org/index.aspx?pagename=core_concepts
http://www.sfn.org/index.aspx?pagename=brainbriefings_main
 
  • #3
atyy said:
These are all useful for neuroscience. If you study sensation and perception you need a basic knowledge of all of these, so you can forget most of it after your exams, but it's good to master them at some stage. Suicide and depression are more clinical topics.
http://www.sfn.org/index.aspx?pagename=core_concepts
http://www.sfn.org/index.aspx?pagename=brainbriefings_main

The reason that I want to study suicide and depression is because December 21, 2008, I broke into my 19 year old brother's apartment, bedroom and then bathroom in an effort to save his life but I found him hanging on his bathroom door with a broken neck after I broke my way in. I took him off of the door and tried to save him but the paramedics and I failed. It has affected me deeply as he was my best friend. I am not interested in counseling those with suicide and depression but I am interested in researching some of the biochemical and electrical variables involved (and whatever else we can learn about it). Three months after my brother committed suicide, my fiance's mother killed herself by purposely overdosing on Morphine.

I know there is a psychological component involved but I am sure there are plenty of things we can understand by studying the brain itself.

However, I am more interested in consciousness, sensation and perception.

I appreciate your response. I will definitely continue pursuing those courses since they do seem valuable in studying Neuroscience.

Is there a particular path that I should pursue so that I can hopefully have an opportunity to conduct research in those areas? There are several different types of major courses that I can select but some of them do not seem like they will help as much.
 

Related to Neuroscience Course Assistance

1. What is neuroscience?

Neuroscience is the study of the nervous system, including its structure, function, and how it relates to behavior and cognition. It is a multidisciplinary field that combines biology, psychology, and other sciences to understand the brain and nervous system at various levels of analysis.

2. Why is it important to study neuroscience?

Studying neuroscience allows us to gain a deeper understanding of how the brain and nervous system work, which can lead to advancements in fields such as medicine, psychology, and technology. It also helps us understand the underlying mechanisms of various neurological disorders and develop treatments for them.

3. What topics are typically covered in a neuroscience course?

A neuroscience course may cover topics such as neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, cognitive neuroscience, developmental neuroscience, and computational neuroscience. It may also touch on related fields such as psychology, biology, and genetics.

4. What skills are needed to succeed in a neuroscience course?

To succeed in a neuroscience course, one needs to have a strong foundation in biology, chemistry, and math. Critical thinking, problem-solving, and strong analytical skills are also important in understanding complex concepts in neuroscience. Good study habits and time management skills are also crucial for success in this course.

5. What career options are available for those who study neuroscience?

There are various career options for those who study neuroscience, including research positions in academia or the pharmaceutical industry, clinical roles in hospitals or healthcare settings, and careers in fields such as biotechnology, neuropsychology, and science communication. Graduates may also pursue further education in specialized areas of neuroscience, such as neurosurgery or neuropharmacology.

Similar threads

  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
6
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
2
Replies
43
Views
4K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
21
Views
2K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
11
Views
948
Replies
3
Views
832
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
8
Views
1K
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • STEM Academic Advising
Replies
16
Views
2K
Back
Top