Neutrinos: Partner of electrons?

In summary: Is the only non trivial situation. Of course both particles are neutral respect to colour.In summary, the electron neutrino behaves like an electron when subjected to weak interactions. It is from the same family as electrons.
  • #1
Swapnil
459
6
I am new to these particles called neutrinos but I was wondering why are they called the "partners" of electrons?
 
Physics news on Phys.org
  • #2
Massless or not, the electronic neutrino behaves like electrons when subject to weak interactions. They're from the same family.

Daniel.
 
  • #3
More exactly, left neutrinos and left electrons are the two sides of a "weak isospin" doublet. Under the action of the W particle, one transforms into the another.
 
  • #4
dextercioby said:
Massless or not, the electronic neutrino behaves like electrons when subject to weak interactions. They're from the same family.

Daniel.
So do neutrinos behave like electrons ONLY in the context of weak interactions? Are any other situations where they would behave the same?
 
  • #5
Swapnil said:
So do neutrinos behave like electrons ONLY in the context of weak interactions? Are any other situations where they would behave the same?
Is the only non trivial situation. Of course both particles are neutral respect to colour.
 
  • #6
Swapnil said:
I am new to these particles called neutrinos but I was wondering why are they called the "partners" of electrons?
In the standard model, leptons occur in three doublets. These are:
The electron and the "electron neutrino".
The muon and the "mu neutrino".
The tau and the "tau neutrino".
In each case, the first lepton in the pair, is negatively charged and much heavier than its neutral neutrino.
 
  • #7
Meir Achuz said:
In the standard model, leptons occur in three doublets. These are:
The electron and the "electron neutrino".
The muon and the "mu neutrino".
The tau and the "tau neutrino".
In each case, the first lepton in the pair, is negatively charged and much heavier than its neutral neutrino.

I realize that this is what everyone does, but I hate talking about the "electron neutrino" as being much lighter than the electron when the "electron neutrino" is not an eigenstate of mass. The neutrino mass eigenstates are [tex]\nu_1, \nu_2, \nu_3[/tex], and I think the whole setup is much more elegant if thes are considered the particles of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd generations.

Otherwise, one treats the quark and lepton mixing in very different terms. If it had been known from the beginning that the neutrinos, like the quarks and electrons, have mass, the notation now would match the notation for the mixed quarks. Instead, the standard model assumed massless neutrinos and here we are.

Carl
 
Last edited:
  • #8
The electron neutrino is the neutrino that couples with the electron in beta decay. That it is not a mass eigenstate, is a different answer to a different question. We have to learn not to hate.
 

Related to Neutrinos: Partner of electrons?

1. What are neutrinos?

Neutrinos are subatomic particles that are one of the fundamental building blocks of matter. They are electrically neutral and have very little mass, making them difficult to detect.

2. How do neutrinos interact with other particles?

Neutrinos interact very weakly with other particles, making them difficult to detect. They primarily interact through the weak nuclear force and gravity, and rarely interact with other particles through the strong nuclear force or electromagnetism.

3. What is the role of neutrinos in the universe?

Neutrinos are important in various astrophysical processes, such as nuclear reactions in stars and supernovae explosions. They also play a role in the evolution and structure of the universe.

4. Are there different types of neutrinos?

Yes, there are three types of neutrinos: electron neutrinos, muon neutrinos, and tau neutrinos. Each type is associated with a different charged lepton (electron, muon, and tau) and can change into one another through a process called neutrino oscillation.

5. How are neutrinos detected?

Neutrinos are detected using large, specialized detectors that are usually located deep underground to minimize interference from other particles. These detectors use various methods such as detecting the flashes of light produced when neutrinos interact with other particles or measuring the tiny amount of heat produced when neutrinos pass through a material.

Similar threads

  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
11
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
2
Views
484
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
3
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
32
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
5
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
3
Replies
80
Views
12K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
6
Views
2K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
10
Views
1K
  • High Energy, Nuclear, Particle Physics
Replies
3
Views
2K
Back
Top