Nobel Prize 2023: Attosecond pulses

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  • #2
Can anyone familiar with this field/technique give us an idea of how important this is?
 
  • #3
Haborix said:
Can anyone familiar with this field/technique give us an idea of how important this is?
The presentation provided a few potential applications.

from 29.57
 
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  • #4
DrClaude said:
They rang Anne L’Huillier to tell her she had won but she was lecturing so they had to try a few times.

When they did get her, they told her but it was only a short call as she wanted to finished her lecture!

I wonder if she told her class?

Amazing.
 
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  • #5
Haborix said:
Can anyone familiar with this field/technique give us an idea of how important this is?
Important enough to be worth a Nobel prize :-p

To be able to probe things that move very fast, like electrons in molecules, one needs very short bursts of light to interrogate systems. These tools have now been available for about a decade and have been used to study electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and non-structures.
 
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  • #7
DrClaude said:
Important enough to be worth a Nobel prize :-p

To be able to probe things that move very fast, like electrons in molecules, one needs very short bursts of light to interrogate systems. These tools have now been available for about a decade and have been used to study electron dynamics in atoms, molecules and non-structures.
Yes, the trouble I have is my own personal interests means some years seem obviously important/cool and others just don’t trigger the same response. This year is the latter, but like you say, it is important enough to get a Nobel Prize, so I’m trying to figure out what I’m missing. Had the same response to the blue LEDs a few years ago.
 
  • #8
pinball1970 said:
I wonder if she told her class?
I don't think you are allowed to say anything until the prize has been officially announced.
 
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  • #9
Haborix said:
Can anyone familiar with this field/technique give us an idea of how important this is?

I think it is a just a (very short) flash in the pan.
 
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Related to Nobel Prize 2023: Attosecond pulses

What are attosecond pulses?

Attosecond pulses are incredibly short bursts of light, each lasting only a few attoseconds, where one attosecond is one quintillionth (10^-18) of a second. These pulses are used to observe and manipulate the dynamics of electrons within atoms and molecules, providing insights into processes that occur on extremely short timescales.

Why was the Nobel Prize awarded for attosecond pulses in 2023?

The Nobel Prize in 2023 was awarded for groundbreaking work in the development and application of attosecond pulses. This research has enabled scientists to capture and study ultrafast events at the atomic and subatomic levels, significantly advancing our understanding of fundamental processes in physics, chemistry, and biology.

How are attosecond pulses generated?

Attosecond pulses are typically generated using high-harmonic generation (HHG) techniques. In this process, a high-intensity laser pulse is focused into a gas, causing the gas atoms to emit light at multiples (harmonics) of the original laser frequency. By carefully controlling the conditions, researchers can produce coherent light pulses that last only a few attoseconds.

What are the applications of attosecond pulses?

Attosecond pulses have a wide range of applications in science and technology. They are used to study electron dynamics in atoms, molecules, and solids, enabling researchers to observe chemical reactions in real-time. Additionally, they have potential applications in developing faster electronics, improving medical imaging techniques, and advancing quantum computing.

Who were the laureates awarded the Nobel Prize for attosecond pulses in 2023?

The Nobel Prize in Physics 2023 was awarded to scientists who made significant contributions to the field of attosecond science. The laureates were recognized for their pioneering work in generating and applying attosecond pulses, which has opened new frontiers in the study of ultrafast phenomena at the atomic scale.

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