1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Nuclear equations and conservation of charge

  1. Jan 11, 2012 #1

    tsutsuji

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Do you know why in most textbooks, like on http://www.lbl.gov/abc/Basic.html or http://books.google.com/books?id=xD0AwBQECasC&pg=PA196 beta decay equations are written like

    [itex]^{14}_{6}C\rightarrow^{14}_{7}N+e^{-}+\overline{\nu}_{e}[/itex]

    instead of

    [itex]^{14}_{6}C\rightarrow^{14}_{7}N^{+}+e^{-}+\overline{\nu}_{e}[/itex]

    Wouldn't the latter be more correct as regards conservation of charge ?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 11, 2012 #2
    I usually see it written as

    [itex]^{14}_{6}C\rightarrow^{14}_{7}N+^{ 0}_{-1}e+^{0}_{0}\overline{\nu}_{e}[/itex]
     
  4. Jan 11, 2012 #3

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    The equation is discussing the nucleus, not the atom. So no need to put a + in front of the N.
     
  5. Jan 11, 2012 #4
    completely agree with Vanadium..... the + is included in the 7 of Nitrogen
     
  6. Jan 11, 2012 #5

    tsutsuji

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    Thanks for all the replies.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Nuclear equations and conservation of charge
  1. Conservation of charge (Replies: 16)

  2. Charge Conservation (Replies: 1)

  3. Charge conservation (Replies: 3)

Loading...