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On my way to

  1. Dec 15, 2005 #1

    cronxeh

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    Well I was on my way to the state written EMT-B exam, sitting on the bus station when at around 6:35 pm EST I spot a black Honda going from the left, and a white van coming from adjacent road. My brain was punching all the numbers and estimated an imminent collision, which took place in about 3 seconds. The Honda's speed was about 10-15 mph, while the van's speed (Econoline 350?) was about 30 mph. The impact was pretty strong - the Honda was thrown off the road and into a sidewalk. I get up and automatically dial 911 and tell them what happened while my eyes are transfixed on the Honda. In about 2 minutes there was the PD and as they got 2 kids (ages about 8) outa the car, the FDNY engines were coming up. It took FDNY 5 minutes flat to get there, and I know these guys - they are stationed 20 blocks away. Unfortunately I didnt have the time to either go over to them and offer any help (I was running late to my exam and the bus was already coming up, and PD was there).

    So the moral of this story is.. dont think its only 10 mph - the damage is very serious, and I'm pretty sure the driver of the Honda was injured.
     
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  3. Dec 15, 2005 #2
    wow. that's scary. doesn't that freak you out knowing that you're gonna be an EMT and have to respond to this stuff all the time? when i got my 'professional rescuer' certification, i got really nervous because now if i don't call the police and i see an accident, or if i don't help a person who's injured in the ways i've been trained to, i can be sued. and its so much responsibility. freaks me out. i dunno what i'd do if i actually saw an accident like that.
     
  4. Dec 15, 2005 #3

    Moonbear

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    That is scary, isn't it? I know a guy who is an EMT and has the EMT plates on his car. His sister wanted to borrow his car, and he had to give her a very long lecture that if she saw ANY sort of accident, as long as she was driving his car, she HAD to stop and let them know she was borrowing her brother's car and wasn't actually an EMT herself so he wouldn't get sued by someone seeing a car with EMT plates whizzing past the scene of an accident. It also seems that once you have that certification, accidents just seem to happen in front of you so much more than for normal people...it's like it makes you a magnet for that sort of thing. But, it's also very honorable and good to know there are people willing to take such responsibility.

    So...how did you do on your exam, Cronxeh? Do you know the results right away, or do you have to wait?
     
  5. Dec 15, 2005 #4

    cronxeh

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    Well the questions were somewhat tricky, but I think I did good. I'm actually considering carrying latex gloves with me from now on :bugeye:
     
  6. Dec 15, 2005 #5

    Moonbear

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    Hmm...maybe you should carry nitrile gloves...don't want to get sued because the person you tried helping was allergic to latex. :biggrin:

    That reminds me, it's probably time to change the gloves in my glovebox. For years now, I've kept disposable gloves in my car glovebox. I'm the sort of person that if I saw an accident and someone was injured and needed immediate first-aid while waiting for the EMTs, I'd help, so I always keep gloves in the car just in case. I have to get the blanket back into my trunk too...used it to wrap stuff while moving and then decided to wash it, and it never made it back in. Gloves, a blanket and a roll of paper towels pretty much covers all the first aid I'm capable of giving (stop the bleeding and keep a potential shock victim warm). Hey, where do you get one of those mouth guard things for doing CPR? That would be a good thing to have too.
     
  7. Dec 15, 2005 #6

    cronxeh

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    Well I have a few of those masks. One is a full face mask by MDS Matrx, and another one is from the CPR training class - Laerdal Manikin Face Shield. But you know, you could probably get something cheaper off Ebay nowadays.

    I think latest study suggested you skip the breaths altogether (not for EMTs of course) - but for CPR's sake, just do the compressions. The theory is that there is enough residual oxygen in the blood to still keep you going, but you need to keep the heart pumping. I dont know how much of this study is correct, but they suggested you do more compressions

    Here I pulled up a quick article: http://www.scienceblog.com/community/older/1997/B/199701441.html

    Even though this is from 1997, In recent literature I've read similar suggestions by MDs

    Problem with CPR compressions is that statistically there is almost a slim to none chance of reviving someone. By doing compressions only you increase the chance of that individual staying profused long enough to be shocked and drugged, and bagged and the whole shebang - before the medics arive.
     
  8. Dec 15, 2005 #7

    Moonbear

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    As long as they aren't used I suppose. :yuck:

    I have always heard the compressions were more important than the breaths, but thought that was taken into account with the 15 compressions: 2 breaths ratio I was taught ages ago (is that even what they still recommend?).

    Yep, I recall that from when I was CPR certified back in high school (everyone got certified as part of our "health class"). It was much more useful than yet another year of memorizing STDs, which is what we were taught over and over in health class. If their heart has actually stopped, you're not likely to get it restarted, just keep the blood circulating long enough so the paramedics can do something.
     
  9. Dec 15, 2005 #8

    cronxeh

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    Well I sure hope it doesnt come down to me having to do CPR and shocking them. But I suppose if it happened at some remote place.. while I was off duty.. and if accidentally happened to have atropine with epinephrine on me.. and.. well.. you get the point. Its tricky, you know.. you could end up saving someone's life dispite breaking numerous laws and protocols, but if you didnt save him (which is still his original definitive course) - you'd get your socks sued off of you. They passed the Good Samaritan law - but really, that thing is pathetic! You arent allowed to push any drugs or use a defibrillator. It makes one wonder who the laws are really protecting. I guess its a common assumption of our beloved congress that all people are created stupid.
     
  10. Dec 15, 2005 #9

    Moonbear

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    Once you're trained and certified, does the Good Samaritan law protect you anymore? Aren't you then a trained professional, not just a bystander trying to be helpful?
     
  11. Dec 15, 2005 #10

    cronxeh

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    Well obviously starting a central line and pushing done meds is waaay out of your scope of practice as a Good Samaritan - just how far I'm not even sure. I think that law only applies to CPR, not even defibrillation!

    But once you are working in an ambulance and have been dispatched, you have a duty to act, and have to do whatever you know how to do. It doesnt really cover you then - if you dont follow protocols you will be sued. As far as I know most EMS are civilian rather than uniformed services, so it could be a bit different


    Ahh here I found the right link: http://www.momsteam.com/alpha/features/cardiac_awareness_center/good_samaritan_laws.shtml
     
    Last edited: Dec 15, 2005
  12. Dec 16, 2005 #11
    I had to give CPR once, I was working in a grocery store when I was 16 and some guy had a heart attack. I was so terrified I did it all wrong. I never checked for a pulse I never swept the mouth. I just did the compressions and breaths. He threw up in my mouth, but he lived.
    Oh, and last night I helped out at an accident. I was sitting on my couch and there was a loud crash outside. then a car honking nonstop. I went out and some drunk had run into a light pole, He smashed his car up pretty good, and was bleeding from a cut on his forehead. I took in the situation with a quick glance and I sprang into action. I grabbed the steering wheel, jerked it hard and got the horn unstuck. then I went back inside and let someone else take care of the drunk.
     
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2005
  13. Dec 16, 2005 #12

    DocToxyn

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    That's funny, we keep blankets, long leather welding gloves, a heavy canvas bag and some rope in our car. It's for rescuing animals that get hit, I suppose it could do double duty for people too.

    Hope you did well on the test, cronxeh.
     
  14. Dec 16, 2005 #13

    cronxeh

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    Heh you need soap in addition to that rope for that :yuck:

    The eery thing (or funny depending on the number of twists in your psyche) - on my way back from the test center I passed by a cemetary and didnt even notice it was almost total darkness and I'm walking by graveyards in the rain. Kinda makes you wonder how quick you can go from there to here :devil:
     
  15. Dec 16, 2005 #14

    Astronuc

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    A week ago there was a head-on collision outside my house.

    I posted some pics. Both cars were probably doing in excess of 40 mph (64 mph). The driver of the red car went tangent to the curve and crossed a double yellow line. The driver of the red car had minor injuries, whereas the driver of the white car was severely injured - notice the driver side wheel is pushed back to where the driver's left foot would be resting on the floor.

    http://www.everything-science.com/component/option,com_smf/Itemid,82/topic,6599.0

    We felt the impact of the cars in our house. There was no sound of horn or skid marks - both cars collided before drivers could respond.

    Possibly the driver of the red car had attention on the CD player, not on the road.
     
  16. Dec 16, 2005 #15
    Driving is scary.

    Many of my friends took the EMT-B certification given at my school. Of course, they were also much more relieved that they had passed their practicals. I've wanted to take the EMT-B course but it's like trying to fit an additional 7 credit hours into my schedule, i.e. not happening.
     
  17. Dec 16, 2005 #16

    cronxeh

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    You might think that would deter me from getting a bike :rofl:

    No, still stubbornly hard headed :!!)
     
  18. Dec 16, 2005 #17

    Moonbear

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    :uhh: Sure...that's what you say it's for. Making a lot of trips to the Meadowlands? *Makes note not to go for a ride with DocToxyn*
     
  19. Dec 16, 2005 #18

    Monique

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    Something like that happened here not too long a go, an old lady was hit by a car and was lying on the street, a police car stopped by and informed bystanders that help was on the way and then left off again because he was not duty, the lady died at the hospital, should he have stayed.
     
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