Oxidizing power of potassium chlorate vs. nitrate

  • Thread starter Mk
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  • #1
Mk
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I was wondering how much stronger potassium chlorate is vs. potassium nitrate in oxidizing power, and how to look up the information for myself next time if possible. Thanks :smile:
 

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  • #2
GCT
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Find the reduction potential for the anions and compare.
 
  • #3
Mk
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I know my elements and took high school chemistry, but I tried looking up what you said and it's a little bit over my head. Could you explain it a different way?
 
  • #4
GCT
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Standard reduction potentials are basically values of electrochemical potentials versus a standard hydrogen electrode, as you may know if an agent is labeled a reducing agent in an chemistry equation it becomes oxidized - it is the electron donor. The opposite applies for an oxidizing agent - it is responsible for taking away the electrons. Standard hydrogen electrodes are given the value of zero and an galvanic electrochemical setup is designed with it at the cathode and an anode setup with the oxidizing agent of your choice and then the voltage difference is measured between the anode and the cathode. The greater the value of this voltage the better the anode agent is as an oxidizing agent in a relative sense.

From what I remember, the more positive the potential, the better the oxidizing agent.
 
  • #5
Mk
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Man, I don't know. I guess I get the answer my question asks for but, I was hoping for an integer or something.
 
  • #6
Kushal
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i have some standard electrode values.

OCl[tex]^{-}_{(aq)}[/tex] + H[tex]^{+}_{(aq)}[/tex] + e[tex]^{-}[/tex] [tex]\Leftrightarrow[/tex] [tex]\frac{1}{2}[/tex]Cl[tex]_{2(aq)}[/tex] + 2H[tex]_{2}[/tex]O[tex]_{(l)}[/tex]

emf = + 1.64 V

NO[tex]^{-}_{3(aq)}[/tex] + 3H[tex]^{+}_{(aq)}[/tex] + 2e[tex]^{-}[/tex] [tex]\Leftrightarrow[/tex] HNO[tex]_{2(aq)}[/tex] + H[tex]_{2}[/tex]O[tex]_{(l)}[/tex]

emf = + 0.94 V


therefore, the chlorate(1) is a stronger oxidising agent.
 
Last edited:
  • #7
lightarrow
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i have some standard electrode values.

OCl[tex]^{-}_{(aq)}[/tex] + H[tex]^{+}_{(aq)}[/tex] + e[tex]^{-}[/tex] [tex]\Leftrightarrow[/tex] [tex]\frac{1}{2}[/tex]Cl[tex]_{2(aq)}[/tex] + 2H[tex]_{2}[/tex]O[tex]_{(l)}[/tex]

emf = + 1.64 V

NO[tex]^{-}_{3(aq)}[/tex] + 3H[tex]^{+}_{(aq)}[/tex] + 2e[tex]^{-}[/tex] [tex]\Leftrightarrow[/tex] HNO[tex]_{2(aq)}[/tex] + H[tex]_{2}[/tex]O[tex]_{(l)}[/tex]

emf = + 0.94 V


therefore, the chlorate(1) is a stronger oxidising agent.
Chlorate is

[tex]ClO_3^{-}[/tex]

not

[tex]ClO^{-}[/tex]
 
  • #8
Kushal
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oooops... yeah it is ClO3-
 
  • #9
Mk
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emf = + 1.64 V

emf = + 0.94 V

therefore, the chlorate(1) is a stronger oxidising agent.
Does this mean it is 1.7x stronger?
 

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