1. Limited time only! Sign up for a free 30min personal tutor trial with Chegg Tutors
    Dismiss Notice
Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

B Particles with electric charges visible to the human eye?

  1. Jan 21, 2016 #1
    Are there any particles known in the Physics world with an either positive or negative charge that can be viewed by the human eye under LED light illumination and have an attraction/repulsion to magnetism?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Jan 21, 2016 #2

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    Define by what you mean by "particle". I can charge tiny styrofoam "particles" and I can see this with my naked eyes. But does this count? Without any elaboration on your definition, I don't know.

    Zz.
     
  4. Jan 21, 2016 #3
    For instance carbon gas particles
     
  5. Jan 21, 2016 #4
    Sure you can see big clumps of particles with a microscope or even individual particles with electron microscope.
     
  6. Jan 21, 2016 #5

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Pretty sure he's referring to individual particles and naked eye

    to which the answer would be no


    Dave
     
  7. Jan 21, 2016 #6
    Thanks Dave
     
  8. Jan 24, 2016 #7
    If you look closely at the condensation window you can faintly see what I am seeing, these were placed inside the sealed bottle last night around 10 pm, out in the open they are repelled by N42 neodymium magnets, just curious if anyone has seen anything like this before and I have some more pictures and will be getting some higher quality pictures with different spectrums
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Jan 24, 2016 #8

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    I'm not exactly sure what you're getting at here. Are you saying that these are images of "individual particles"? I can see dust particles in the air whenever the light shines just right.

    Look, I still think that your idea of "individual particle" is very vague (in fact, you've offered none other than a puzzling example even after I asked).

    Here are the facts: well-known "particles", such as electrons, protons, etc... are WAY to small to be seen by our naked eyes. Period. The light that can be used in a similar fashion as what we ordinarily see have wavelengths that are just orders of magnitude too short to be within the visible range (they are also too energetic to be safely viewed with our eyes).

    So unless you have a definitive length scale that you consider to be within your definition of "individual particles", the answer you'll get can range from "NO" to "YES", because your definition is fluid and appears to have no clear boundaries.

    Zz,.
     
  10. Jan 24, 2016 #9

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    agree with Zz

    Joe, you need to define YOUR definition of particles
    As Zz indicated, to a physicist, particles are atoms and sub-atomic particles that make up atoms

    your pic shows water droplets they are huge in comparison and easily distinguishable to the naked eye and definitely don't fall into the
    realm of what are termed particles

    Dave
     
  11. Jan 26, 2016 #10


    I took a video to try and better illustrate what I am seeing, just thought it was fascinating the wave and particle action. The video was taken in a room with no ventilation.
     
  12. Jan 26, 2016 #11

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    I appears that you have zero intention in addressing the issue that I had brought up, which makes this a one way conversation that I'm on longer interested in participating.

    My point about dust particles still stand.

    Zz.
     
  13. Jan 26, 2016 #12
    These are C3H8O2 PG, atomised, not dust, and to my knowledge dust does not react to magnetism
     
  14. Jan 26, 2016 #13

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

    This has nothing to do with magnetism, or charge particles. It has everything to do with SIZE and the definition of "particle" in your original question. To SEE something with your naked eyes does NOT require it to react with magnetism, or have a charge! It has everything to do with how that particle can be distinguished using light in the visible spectrum!

    This "size" of a "particle" is what you have failed to define, and what is causing your question to be ambiguous.

    Zz.
     
  15. Jan 27, 2016 #14

    CWatters

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper

    At what point in the video do you switch on the magnetic field? I couldn't see any obvious reaction.
     
  16. Jan 27, 2016 #15
    I will post another video, with the N42 magnet, that was just the particles
     
  17. Jan 28, 2016 #16
  18. Jan 28, 2016 #17

    Vanadium 50

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor

    He's been asked four times and for some inexplicable reason refuses to provide one. What is with all these questions where the OP pushes to keep the question vague?
     
  19. Jan 28, 2016 #18

    davenn

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    I'm going to give up on this thread and move on :rolleyes:
     
  20. Jan 28, 2016 #19

    ZapperZ

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor
    Education Advisor
    2016 Award

  21. Feb 8, 2016 #20
    I'm studying the effects PG after it has been ran through upward spiral coil at 40A .5 Ohm, from what I see it has an charge, I'm sorry I am a beginner to all of this, but here is another video you might have much more insight than me on , I'm sorry for the misclassification or naked eye at the beginning.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook




Similar Discussions: Particles with electric charges visible to the human eye?
Loading...