Phenomenon for lip motor boating?

  • Thread starter yangshi
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  • #1
yangshi
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Randomly popped in my mind when trying to design microvalves and no idea where to post this... Lip motorboating is when you exhale with your mouth closed, causing your lips to flap like a horse and make a fart sound. My question is not what causes the sound but what causes the lip vibration. Any explanations (i.e cyclic battle b/w exhale pressure and stiffness/gravity) or EASY papers on this? I’d like specifics too (i.e is gravity negligible?)

Edit: Any related equations would be nice too - i.e (spitballing here...) static aeroelastic equations of motion.
 
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Answers and Replies

  • #2
Klystron
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If you are serious, the effect you describe is used to play a wind instrument.
The lips control a vibrating bit of wood held in the mouth in reed instruments while the musicians lips purse together and vibrate in an external metal mouthpiece in brass_instruments particularly horns.

The sound derives from air movement from the lungs while controlling lip positions. An excellent example from early wood instruments, the Didgeridoo provides resonance that reverberates in the player's (and listeners') chest.

 

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