Dismiss Notice
Join Physics Forums Today!
The friendliest, high quality science and math community on the planet! Everyone who loves science is here!

Position and Position vector

  1. Oct 5, 2013 #1

    san203

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    What is a position vector? Is their any difference between the position vector and position? Isnt position of a point supposed to represent its direction in Cartesian plane as well(Positive quadrants , negative quadrants). So why two different terms?
     
  2. jcsd
  3. Oct 5, 2013 #2

    phinds

    User Avatar
    Insights Author
    Gold Member

    Just at a guess, I'd say it's like this: position in a 2D Cartesian coordinate system is absolute and is described by two numbers. A position vector is relative to some starting point, which MIGHT be the origin but might not be.
     
  4. Oct 5, 2013 #3

    jbunniii

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Homework Helper
    Insights Author
    Gold Member

    One might say that a position vector ##[x\,\,y]## is the equivalence class of pairs of points ##(a,b)##, ##(c,d)## in the plane satisfying ##c-a = x## and ##d-b = y##.
     
  5. Oct 5, 2013 #4

    mathman

    User Avatar
    Science Advisor
    Gold Member

    Position in a plane: (x,y)
    Position vector in a plane: vector from (0,0) to (x,y)
     
  6. Oct 6, 2013 #5

    san203

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    But isnt position in plane also calculated relative to origin?

    Sorry. I didnt understand that at all.

    Edit#2 : Thanks. Your answers were right i guess.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2013
  7. Oct 6, 2013 #6

    HallsofIvy

    User Avatar
    Staff Emeritus
    Science Advisor

    Personally, I don't like the very concept of a "position vector"- it only makes sense in Euclidean space. When I was young and foolish (I'm not young any more) I worried a great deal about what a "position vector" looked like on a sphere. Did it "curve" around the surface of the sphere or did it go through the sphere? The answer, of course, is that the only true vectors are tangent vectors that lie in the tangent plane to the surface at each point.
     
  8. Oct 6, 2013 #7

    san203

    User Avatar
    Gold Member

    This really went over my head, but when i do learn things like this i'll try to keep what you said in mind.
     
  9. Oct 7, 2013 #8
    A position vector is a vector in Euclidean space that points from the origin to your location
     
  10. Oct 10, 2013 #9
    I would say that the biggest difference is that a position vector assumes you are working in a space with numbers (like a Vector Space) and a position may not.

    If you are studying Euclidean Geometry, based on the Elements, there are no numbers (at least for many books there is no need of numbers). So a position might be described as the intersection of two lines, or the center of a circle. In this case, there is no position vector, only a position. You are working in a Euclidean space that does not have the usual Vector Space information available.
     
Know someone interested in this topic? Share this thread via Reddit, Google+, Twitter, or Facebook

Have something to add?
Draft saved Draft deleted
Similar Discussions: Position and Position vector
  1. Position vectors (Replies: 3)

Loading...