Powering a 250 VDC Motor with 390 VDC – Questions?

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In summary, the conversation discusses a 250 VDC motor that was drawing 390 VDC, with the voltage regulator being suggested as the potential cause. However, the motor speed remained constant despite the increase in voltage. It is also mentioned that an electrician reported a similar situation, with the possibility of a meter being set to the wrong scale.
  • #1
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A 250 VDC motor drawing 390 VDC!
any one with any explanation?

Thanks.
 
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  • #2
EEFinder said:
A 250 VDC motor drawing 390 VDC!
any one with any explanation?

Thanks.

Motors do not "draw" voltage...
 
  • #3
Thanks for the reminder, I used the wrong word, and it is not current

the Voltage reading instead of being around 250VDC, it was around 390VDC
 
  • #4
Adjust the voltage regulator. Is the speed OK at 390VDC, motor speed at constant load is proportional to voltage.
 
  • #5
thanks for the replay,

and that's what baffled me, the speed looked unchanged!
 
  • #6
EEFinder said:
thanks for the replay,

and that's what baffled me, the speed looked unchanged!
What's going on with drawn current?
 
  • #7
? What is nature of supply? Is it capable of 390 volts ?

An analog meter that's set to AC volts scale will report high if connected to DC volts.
 
  • #8
Jim,
That was actually the case.
By the end of the day on Thursday one of the electrician reported the situation. when I checked it on Friday morning, as well as few other times during the day, it was right on the money. When reviewed the Situation with the electrician, he stated that he was not sure if his meter was sat on DC!
 

1. Can a 250 VDC motor be safely powered with 390 VDC?

Yes, it is possible to power a 250 VDC motor with 390 VDC. However, it is important to note that the voltage should be regulated and within the motor's specified operating range to prevent damage.

2. Is there a risk of overheating or burning out the motor when using 390 VDC?

If the motor is designed to handle a higher voltage, there should be no risk of overheating or burning out. However, it is important to check the motor's specifications and ratings to ensure it can handle the increased voltage.

3. What would be the advantages of using 390 VDC instead of 250 VDC to power the motor?

The main advantage of using 390 VDC is that it allows for higher torque and power output from the motor. This can be beneficial in applications that require higher performance or heavier loads.

4. Are there any additional components or modifications needed to use 390 VDC instead of 250 VDC?

In most cases, using 390 VDC instead of 250 VDC will require additional components such as a voltage regulator or converter to ensure the voltage is within the motor's operating range. It is important to consult the motor's specifications and consult with an expert before making any modifications.

5. Can a 250 VDC motor be used to generate power from a 390 VDC source?

Yes, a 250 VDC motor can be used to generate power from a 390 VDC source. However, it is important to consider the motor's power rating and efficiency to determine if it is suitable for the specific application.

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