Predict Magnetic Permeability?

In summary, it seems difficult to predict the permeability of an alloy without first creating the alloy and then testing it. However, if you are only interested in an approximation, the permeability of various combinations of iron, nickel, and copper may be useful. Additionally, it would be interesting to see how additions of other common metals affect the permeability of an alloy.
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Is there any way to predict an approximation for the magnetic permeability of an alloy? I imagine that getting accurate results would be near impossible without creating the alloy and then testing it, so I'm looking more for just an order of magnitude (10x) or even a tolerance of maybe ± 50% or less. Specifically, I'm looking for the permeabilities of various combinations of iron, nickel, and copper. It would also be nice to be able to see how additions of other common metals, such as zinc, silver, and aluminum, would affect the permeability of an alloy; although, I think each of those would reduce permeability. My goal is to get maximum permeability with my only source of nickel being a 75/25 Cu/Ni alloy.
 
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  • #2
Doubtless you've searched Bozorth? I'm away from my copy , but he's all over the 'net.

But I'm no expert. Page 10 of this pdf is plenty to humble me.

http://www3.alcatel-lucent.com/bstj/vol15-1936/articles/bstj15-1-63.pdf
 
  • #3
jim hardy said:
Page 10 of this pdf is plenty to humble me.

http://www3.alcatel-lucent.com/bstj/vol15-1936/articles/bstj15-1-63.pdf

That really is great work, but I pretty much gave up after page 11. If I'd have to figure out the crystal structure of an alloy, take into account the excess of positive or negative spins of each atom in the unit crystal, figure out how easily these excesses can be paralleled based off of the distance between the atoms, and such, I'd much rather just cast and label samples of different alloys and measure their pulling force on a certain magnet or measure/calculate how much they multiply the inductance of a coil of wire. I didn't want to waste materials on making samples, but if it would be that complicated to calculate the permeability, I'd rather choose the sample method. I appreciate the pdf.
 

Related to Predict Magnetic Permeability?

1. What is magnetic permeability?

Magnetic permeability is a measure of the ability of a material to be magnetized in the presence of an external magnetic field. It is a physical property that describes the extent to which a material can support the formation of a magnetic field within itself.

2. How is magnetic permeability measured?

Magnetic permeability is typically measured using a device called a permeameter. This instrument applies a known magnetic field to a material and measures the resulting magnetic flux density. The ratio of the magnetic flux density to the applied magnetic field gives the value of magnetic permeability.

3. What factors affect magnetic permeability?

The magnetic permeability of a material is affected by various factors such as its chemical composition, crystal structure, temperature, and the presence of impurities. In general, materials with high concentrations of iron, nickel, and cobalt tend to have higher magnetic permeability.

4. How does magnetic permeability relate to magnetism?

Magnetic permeability is directly related to the strength of a material's magnetic field. Materials with high magnetic permeability are more easily magnetized and can sustain stronger magnetic fields. This is why materials such as iron and steel are commonly used in the production of magnets.

5. Can magnetic permeability be predicted?

Yes, magnetic permeability can be predicted by studying the physical and chemical properties of a material. However, accurate prediction can be challenging due to the complex nature of magnetic materials and the many factors that can influence their permeability. Advanced techniques such as quantum mechanics and computational simulations are often used to predict magnetic permeability in different materials.

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